ժNO2004.36


Complexity Digest 2004.36

Archive: http://www.comdig.org, European Mirror: http://www.comdig.de Asian
Mirror: http://www.phil.pku.edu.cn/resguide/comdig/ (Chinese GB-Code) "I think
the next century will be the century of complexity." Stephen Hawking

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Content:

01. Managing Complexity, arXiv
01.01. The Next Shock: Not Oil, but Debt, NY Times
01.02. Adaptation in Large-Scale Enterprise Systems, Ubiquity
01.03. Letting Gamers Play God, and Now Themselves, NY Times
02. Preferential Exchange: Strengthening Connections In Complex Networks, Phys.
02.01. Social Networks And Aggressive Behaviour In Chinese Children, Int. J.
Behav. Dev.
02.02. Employment, Deterrence, And Crime In A Dynamic Model, Int. Econ. Rev.
02.03. Virtual Warfare: The Internet As The New Site For Global Religious
Conflict, Asian J. Soc. Sc.
02.04. ScheduleNanny: Using GPS to Learn the User's Significant Locations,
Travel Times and Schedule, arXiv
03. Something New In Old Europe?, Innovation: Euro. J. Soc. Sc.
03.01. Asian Americans: Achievements Mask Challenges, Asian J. Soc. Sc.
04. Scientific Method Man, Wired
04.01. Biggest Bets in the Universe Unveiled, PhysicsWeb
04.02. A World of Glass, Science
04.03. The Future Of Nanotechnology, Physics World
05. Climate Change: Crunch Time For Kyoto, Nature
05.01. Disaster Movie Highlights Transatlantic Divide, Nature
05.02. The More We Know, The More We See: The Role Of Visuality In Media
Literacy, Ameri. Behav. Sc.
06. Brain May Produce its Own Antipsychotic Drug, New Scientist
06.01. Rare Deficit Maps Thinking Circuitry, ScienceDaily
06.02. Scientists View 'Dark Side' Of The Body, ScienceDaily
06.03. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect Mouse Neurons From Deterioration, Science
Now
07. The Emergence of Competition Between Model Protocells, Science
08. Longevity, Quality, and the One-Hoss Shay, Science
08.01. Human Ancestors Quickly Found Their Feet, NewScientist
08.02. Humans March To A Faster Genetic "Drummer" Than Primates, bio.com
08.03. Evolutionary Biology: Time, Space And Genomes, Nature
09. Bonemaking Protein Tied To Beak Diversity In Darwin's Finches, Science Now
09.01. Molecular Shaping of the Beak, Science
09.02. Fossils' Regenerated Appendages Tell A Tale Of Escalating Predation,
Science Now
10. Cell Biology: Regulated Self-Cannibalism, Nature
10.01. Cancer: Cell Survival Guide, Nature
10.02. MIT Team Explains Yin-Yang Of Ginseng, bio.com
11. Brain Scans Reveal Differences In Dyslexics Who Speak Different Types Of
Languages, Science Now
11.01. Pollution Triggers Bizarre Behaviour In Animals, NewScientist
12. Scattering Poop Around Their Nests Helps Burrowing Owls Lure Tasty Beetles,
Science Now
12.01. Flying Fox Favours Tunnel Vision, BBC News
13. Single Gene Removes Sex Differences In Mice Brains, NewScientist
13.01. Theoretical Biology: Mushrooms In Cyberspace, Nature
13.02. Stem Cells From Hair Follicles Regenerate Skin And Hair In Mice, Science
Now
14. Bending Sound The 'Wrong' Way Sharpens Scans, NewScientist
14.01. Finally, a Car That Talks Back, Wired
14.02. Software Solutions for Self-organizing Multimedia-Appliances, Computers
& Graphics
15. Physics And Music: Brothers In Art, Nature
15.01. Statistical Physics: Hear The Noise, Nature
16. Earthquake Theory Shaken, Science Now
16.01. Mission Inside The Fault Zone, BBC News
16.02. Planet Formation: The Core Problem, Nature
17. Tough Decisions - How And When You Make Them Says A Lot About You,
Darwinmag.com
17.01. Good Schools or Bad? Conflicting Ratings Leave Parents Baffled, NY Times
18. Denying the Troops a Secret Ballot, NY Times
19. Complex Challenges: Global Terroist Networks
19.01. Mr. Bush and the Truth About Terror, NY Times
19.02. Pakistan Dismisses US Contention Of Progress In Bin Laden Hunt, Boston
Globe
19.03. Putin Refuses To Talk With 'Child Killers', CBC News
20. Links & Snippets
20.01. Other Publications
20.02. Webcast Announcements
20.03. Conference & Call for Papers Announcements

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01. Managing Complexity , arXiv

Excerpt: Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the
behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological
systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most
challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed
economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale
systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g.,
auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent
optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use
physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems
and deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. (...)

* Managing Complexity, David P. Chassin , Joel Malard , Christian Posse ,
2004/08/27, DOI: nlin.AO/0408051, arXiv
* Contributed by Carlos Gershenson


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01.01. The Next Shock: Not Oil, but Debt , NY Times

Excerpts:





(...) American economy is much less addicted to the black stuff than
yesterday's industrial economy. From 1973 to 2003, after all, the amount of oil
and gas needed to create a dollar of gross domestic product fell by half.
(...)
The bad news is that other recent structural changes in the economy - the
federal government's shift from surpluses to huge deficits, the national
predilection for consumption over saving and housing prices that climb faster
than incomes - have increased the country's reliance on another kind of fuel:
credit.

* The Next Shock: Not Oil, but Debt, Daniel Gross  , 04/09/05, NYTimes


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01.02. Adaptation in Large-Scale Enterprise Systems , Ubiquity

Excerpts:




Enterprise Management Analytics



Contemporary business enterprises, embodied in global corporations, are
intricate organizational, technological and financial meta-systems operating
under dynamic market conditions and uncertain business circumstances. We see
them as large-scale, distributed systems characterized by very high complexity.
They are typically heterogeneous and very dynamic, involving complex
interactions among many humans, applications, services, and devices.

Consequently, enterprises are likely to contain inefficiencies (for example,
unnecessary human labor or under-utilized computing resources); they are prone
to poor decision-making (...) and they experience delays and latencies (...).

* Adaptation in Large-Scale Enterprise Systems, Kemal A. Delic  , Umeshwar
Dayal , 04/08/04, Ubiquity, Volume 5, Issue 23, 04/08/04


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01.03. Letting Gamers Play God, and Now Themselves , NY Times

Excerpts: "Most role-playing games, you have to make an enormous amount of
choices up front: I'm going to be a thief or a barbarian. (...)" Mr. Molyneux
wanted to create a video game in which these types of choices are made with the
same pace and subtlety as in real life.

And so in Fable, the player-controlled hero will end up a barbarian only after
building muscles in fistfights, earning scars from combat and acquiring a
heroic tan from constant journeying outdoors.

* Letting Gamers Play God, and Now Themselves, Stephen Totilo  , 04/09/02,
NYTimes


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02. Preferential Exchange: Strengthening Connections In Complex Networks ,
Phys.

Abstract: Many social, technological, and biological interactions involve
network relationships whose outcome intimately depends on the structure of the
network and on the strengths of the connections. Yet, although much information
is now available concerning the structure of many networks, the strengths are
more difficult to measure. Here we show that, for one particular social
network, notably the e-mail network, a suitable measure of the strength of the
connections can be available. We also propose a simple mechanism, based on
positive feedback and reciprocity, that can explain the observed behavior and
that hints toward specific dynamics of formation and reinforcement of network
connections. Network data from contexts different from social sciences indicate
that power-law, and generally broad, distributions of the connection strength
are ubiquitous, and the proposed mechanism has a wide range of applicability.

* Preferential Exchange: Strengthening Connections In Complex Networks, G.
Caldarelli , F. Coccetti , P. De Los Rios,  , 04/08, Phys. Rev. E 70, 027102


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02.01. Social Networks And Aggressive Behaviour In Chinese Children , Int. J.
Behav. Dev.

Excerpts: This exploratory study investigated Mainland Chinese children's
social networks and peer group affiliations with a particular emphasis on their
aggressive behaviour. The participants were 294 elementary school students in
Tianjin, P. R. China (...). Social network analysis identified relatively large
and gender-specific peer groups. Although different measures were used, the
pattern of homophily characteristic of Western aggressive children was
partially supported. This finding may be due to the large size of the peer
groups. The results showed that some aggressive children formed friendships
with nonaggressive children. (...) These findings illustrate how culture may be
an influence on patterns of peer group affiliation.

* Social Networks And Aggressive Behaviour In Chinese Children, Y. Xu  , J. A.
Farver  , D. Schwartz  , L. Chang , Sep. 2004, DOI: 10.1080/01650250444000090,
International Journal of Behavioral Development
* Contributed by Atin Das


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02.02. Employment, Deterrence, And Crime In A Dynamic Model , Int. Econ. Rev.

Abstract: Using maximum likelihood techniques and monthly panel data we solve
and estimate an explicitly dynamic model of criminal behavior where current
criminal activity impacts future labor market outcomes. We show that the threat
of future adverse effects in the labor market when arrested acts as a strong
deterrent to crime. Moreover, such forward-looking behavior is estimated to be
important. Hence, policies that weaken this deterrence will be much less
effective in fighting crime. This suggests that prevention is more powerful
than redemption since anticipated redemption allows criminals to look forward
to negating the consequences of their crimes.

* Employment, Deterrence, And Crime In A Dynamic Model, S. Imai  , K. Krishna ,
Aug. 2004, DOI: 10.1111/j.0020-6598.2004.00289.x, International Economic Review
* Contributed by Atin Das


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02.03. Virtual Warfare: The Internet As The New Site For Global Religious
Conflict , Asian J. Soc. Sc.

Excerpts: This paper explores the ways in which a resurgent Hindu
fundamentalism (Hindutva) is redefining Hinduism and Hindu identities in a
transnational, global context. The global project of Hindutva makes use of new
global communication channels, including the Internet, and is apparently
espoused by influential sections of the transnational Hindu middle class,
especially in the United States. This paper examines a selected sample of
Internet sites devoted to the spread of religious and fundamentalist beliefs
and ideas particularly relevant to India and transnational Hinduism, and
explores the ways in which the Internet is changing the shape of communities
(...)

* Virtual Warfare: The Internet As The New Site For Global Religious Conflict,
R. Robinson , Jun. 2004, DOI: 10.1163/1568531041705121, Asian Journal of Social
Science
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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02.04. ScheduleNanny: Using GPS to Learn the User's Significant Locations,
Travel Times and Schedule , arXiv

Abstract: As computing technology becomes more pervasive, personal devices such
as the PDA, cell-phone, and notebook should use context to determine how to
act. Location is one form of context that can be used in many ways. We present
a multiple-device system that collects and clusters GPS data into significant
locations. These locations are then used to determine travel times and a
probabilistic model of the user's schedule, which is used to intelligently
alert the user. We evaluate our system and suggest how it should be integrated
with a variety of applications.

* ScheduleNanny: Using GPS to Learn the User's Significant Locations, Travel
Times and Schedule, Parth Bhawalkar , Victor Bigio , Adam Davis , Karthik
Narayanaswami , Femi Olumoko , 2004/09/02, DOI: cs.AI/0409003, arXiv
* Contributed by Carlos Gershenson


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03. Something New In Old Europe? , Innovation: Euro. J. Soc. Sc.

Excerpts: This paper investigates whether EU research programmes have led to
innovations in European social research. This is based on an assessment of a
group of EU-funded projects on the changing nature of work in Europe. EU-funded
projects have contributed to the creation of a European social space for
European researchers, but at the cost of consolidating English as the lingua
franca of European social research. Such projects tend to involve heterogeneous
research actors and are oriented towards policy issues. (...) More clearly,
they have ensured that social research about Europe is no longer simply
comparative research. (...)

* Something New In Old Europe?, J. Wickham , Sep. 2004, DOI:
10.1080/1351161042000241135, Innovation: The European Journal of Social
Sciences
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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03.01. Asian Americans: Achievements Mask Challenges , Asian J. Soc. Sc.

Abstract: This article focuses on the existence of the "glass ceiling" to
upward career mobility experienced by Asian Americans in professional
occupations. It questions the recent portrayal of Asian Americans as a "model
minority" who have "made it" in America. Instead, it shows that despite their
good record of achievement, Asian Americans do not reach a level at which they
can participate in policy and decision-making responsibilities. This article
builds on the emerging glass ceiling literature by Asian American scholars,
while examining social/cultural complexities, peculiarities, and nuances in
private companies, government agencies, and institutions of higher education.

* Asian Americans: Achievements Mask Challenges, R. Varma , Jun. 2004, DOI:
10.1163/1568531041705103, Asian Journal of Social Science
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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04. Scientific Method Man , Wired

Excerpts: One of the tools in the toolkit, as he says, is a field called
judgment and decisionmaking. Psychological studies suggest that experts,
defined as someone with 10 years in a discipline, don't have any more reasoning
power than the rest of us. What they have is tons of experience. An old doctor,
for instance, has seen so many cases of the mumps that he no longer follows
methodical reasoning to arrive at a diagnosis. He instead uses a shortcut
called pattern-matching: face red and swollen - mumps. Next!

* Scientific Method Man, Joseph D'Agnese  , 04/09, Wired


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04.01. Biggest Bets in the Universe Unveiled , PhysicsWeb

Excerpts: Betting on the greatest unsolved problems in the universe is no
longer the preserve of academic superstars such as Stephen Hawking. From
Thursday anyone will be able to place bets on whether the biggest physics
experiments in the world will come good before 2010. For two weeks,
British-based bookmaker Ladbrokes is opening a book on five separate
discoveries: life on Titan, gravitational waves, the Higgs boson, cosmic ray
origins and nuclear fusion.

* Biggest Bets in the Universe Unveiled, 2004/08/26, PhysicsWeb
* Contributed by Nadia Gershenson


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04.02. A World of Glass , Science

Excerpts: We are still uncertain as to why the Renaissance of the 14th, 15th,
and 16th centuries, and the scientific and industrial revolutions of the 17th
and 18th centuries took place. Nor do we understand why these sweeping changes
happened in western Europe, and not in the great Islamic or Chinese
civilizations.

The interplay between the availability of more reliable information and the
improved manufacture of tools, instruments, and artifacts contributed to the
remarkable changes that swept through western Europe.
Douglas Adams spoke of the four epochs of how we used sand, the basis of both
optical as semiconductor technologies.

* A World of Glass, Alan Macfarlane  , Gerry Martin , 04/09/03, Science :
1407-1408


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04.03. The Future Of Nanotechnology , Physics World

Excerpts: Visions of self-replicating nanomachines that could devour the Earth
in a "grey goo" are probably wide of the mark, but "radical nanotechnology"
could still deliver great benefits to society. The question is how best to
achieve this goal

Nanotechnology is slowly creeping into popular culture, but not in a way that
most scientists will like.(...)


What we could call "incremental nanotechnology" involves improving the
properties of many materials by controlling their nano-scale structure.
Plastics, for example, can be reinforced using nano-scale clay particles,
making them stronger, stiffer and more chemically resistant.

* The Future Of Nanotechnology, Richard Jones  , 04/08, Physics World


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05. Climate Change: Crunch Time For Kyoto , Nature

Excerpts: Unlike Europe and the United States, where most scientists strongly
support efforts to limit greenhouse-gas emissions, Russia is under virtually no
pressure from its scientific community to take steps to avert climate change.
While the majority remains silent, a small group within the Russian Academy of
Sciences speaks with nationalistic fervour about the need to avoid restrictions
on the Russian economy. In post-soviet Russia, where economic hardship and
growing nationalism are everyday realities, it is difficult for anyone to speak
out against them.

* Climate Change: Crunch Time For Kyoto, Quirin Schiermeie , Bryon MacWilliams
, 04/09/02, DOI: 10.1038/431012a, Nature 431, 12 - 13


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05.01. Disaster Movie Highlights Transatlantic Divide , Nature

Excerpts: "Most people here associate climate change with heatwaves and
floods," he says. "The film has made them ask: 'If this is what climate change
is like, than we are no longer sure it is real'."

But the US study ?(...) ?shows a different picture. (...)

But of the 529 people interviewed after the film's release, half of the hundred
or so who had seen it said that it had made them "somewhat or much more
worried" about global warming, whereas only 1% said that they became less
worried.

* Disaster Movie Highlights Transatlantic Divide, Quirin Schiermeier  ,
04/09/02, DOI: 10.1038/431004a, Nature 431, 4


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05.02. The More We Know, The More We See: The Role Of Visuality In Media
Literacy , Ameri. Behav. Sc.

Excerpts: The role of visual perception in media literacy is paramount in
understanding the shift from a linear perceptual process (literacy) to a
holistic perceptual process (visuality) by which almost all information is now
transmitted through the visual forms of mass media: television, film, and the
Internet. The media-literate individual must be educated in the processes of
visual perception and how the media use the visual channels to transmit, and
often distort, information. (...) The more we know the more we see-as well as
the next most important axiom: What is not seen is as important as what is
seen.

* The More We Know, The More We See: The Role Of Visuality In Media Literacy,
D. Natharius , Oct. 2004, DOI: 10.1177/0002764204267269, American Behavioral
Scientist
* Contributed by Atin Das


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06. Brain May Produce its Own Antipsychotic Drug , New Scientist

Contibuting Editor's Note: Among different neurotransmitters, which are present
in the human neurvous system, there is a group of them called canabinoids,
which activate canabinoid receptors. Nowadays there are three different groups
in the general group of canabinoids: herbal (Tetrahydrocannabinol-THC, the
psychoactive ingredient of cannabis sativa), synthetic and endogenous.
Neurtotransmitter anandamide belongs to the latter. Anandamide is similar to
THC in its pharamacological effects but weaker in strength. Both are binding to
the receptors which are found primarly in the brain, and reproductive system.
Excerpts: Heavy cannabis use has been linked to psychosis in the past, leading
researchers to look for a connection between the brain's natural cannabinoid
system and schizophrenia. (...) [When the team of researches] looked at levels
of the natural cannabis-like substance anandamide, they were higher in people
with schizophrenia than in healthy controls. (...) [Researches] found, to their
surprise, that the more severe people's schizophrenia was the lower their
anandamide levels. The team's theory is that rather than triggering psychosis,
the substance is released in response to psychotic symptoms to help control
them. People with the worst symptoms might be unable to produce sufficient
anandamide to prevent them.(...) But people with schizophrenia who use cannabis
actually have more severe and frequent psychotic episodes than those who do
not. This may be because THC makes anandamide receptors less sensitive.

* Brain May Produce its Own Antipsychotic Drug, 2004/08/30, New Scientist
* Contributed by Nadia Gershenson


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06.01. Rare Deficit Maps Thinking Circuitry , ScienceDaily

Excerpts: Using brain imaging, neuroscientists (...) have pinpointed the site
of a defect in a brain circuit associated with a specific thinking deficit.
Their study demonstrates how a rare genetic disorder, Williams Syndrome, can
offer clues as to how genetic flaws may translate into cognitive symptoms in
more common and complex major mental disorders. (...) traced the thinking
deficit to a circuit at the back of the brain that processes locations of
objects in the visual field. (...) The study focused on the inability to
visualize an object as a set of parts and then construct a replica, as in
assembling a puzzle (...).

* Rare Deficit Maps Thinking Circuitry, 2004/09/02, ScienceDaily & NIH/National
Institute Of Mental Health
* Contributed by Atin Das


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06.02. Scientists View 'Dark Side' Of The Body , ScienceDaily

Excerpts: Even the tiniest paper cut kicks the immune system into action.
Infection-fighting white blood cells, called neutrophils, rush to the site of
injury and initiate inflammation. Calling for back up, the neutrophils quickly
recruit more of their kind to the scene, and commence to kill any bacteria they
find. The skirmishes and casualties cause the skin around the cut to swell and
redden until, victory in sight, the first wave of inflammation subsides. (...)
Yet these defensive forces have a dark side as well. Unchecked, raging
inflammation can damage the very tissues the immune system is designed to
protect. (...)

* Scientists View 'Dark Side' Of The Body, 2004/09/03, ScienceDaily &
University Of Southern California
* Contributed by Atin Das


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06.03. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect Mouse Neurons From Deterioration , Science
Now

Excerpts: People who eat a lot of omega-3 fatty acids--the famous fat from
fish--are less likely to get Alzheimer's disease, but no one knows how the fats
protect the brain from damage. A new study with mice, however, provides some
intriguing clues.
The omega-3 fatty acid known as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) abounds in healthy
neurons. But in Alzheimer's brains, it appears to get trashed by the amyloid
protein that makes up the damaging plaques that characterize the disease.

* Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect Mouse Neurons From Deterioration, Mary Beckman  ,
04/09/01, Science Now


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07. The Emergence of Competition Between Model Protocells , Science

Abstract: The transition from independent molecular entities to cellular
structures with integrated behaviors was a crucial aspect of the origin of
life. We show that simple physical principles can mediate a coordinated
interaction between genome and compartment boundary, independent of any genomic
functions beyond self-replication. RNA, encapsulated in fatty acid vesicles,
exerts an osmotic pressure on the vesicle membrane that drives the uptake of
additional membrane components, leading to membrane growth at the expense of
relaxed vesicles, which shrink. Thus, more efficient RNA replication could
cause faster cell growth, leading to the emergence of Darwinian evolution at
the cellular level.

* The Emergence of Competition Between Model Protocells, Irene A. Chen  ,
Richard W. Roberts , Jack W. Szostak
, 04/09/03, Science : 1474-1476.



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08. Longevity, Quality, and the One-Hoss Shay , Science

Excerpts: The task of aging-related research and geriatric medicine is to
improve the quality of life during a period in which some loss of function is
the order of the day. And the research reported in this issue, (...), is
beginning to suggest how cell and tissue death relate to organismal aging. How
is replication failure related to cellular senescence? What is the role of
telomere shortening and telomerase expression?

At the whole-organism level, we know that caloric restriction has a pronounced
effect in promoting longevity

* Longevity, Quality, and the One-Hoss Shay, Donald Kennedy , 04/09/03, Science
: 1369


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08.01. Human Ancestors Quickly Found Their Feet , NewScientist

Excerpts: Hominids started walking on two legs six million years ago, shortly
after diverging from chimpanzees, according to a study of the inner structure
of a fossilised thighbone. The finding puts upright posture at the base of the
human family tree.

The evolution of upright posture is a key issue in anthropology. Together with
large brain size, it marks the dividing line between humans and the great
apes.
Researchers know that upright posture evolved first because the skeleton of
famed Australopithecine, Lucy, has a small braincase but modern ankles.

* Human Ancestors Quickly Found Their Feet, Jeff Hecht  , 04/09/02, New
Scientist


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08.02. Humans March To A Faster Genetic "Drummer" Than Primates , bio.com

Excerpts: A team of biochemists from UC Riverside published a paper that gives
one explanation for why humans and primates are so closely related genetically,
but so clearly different biologically and intellectually.

"The explosive expansion of the DNA repeats and the resulting restructuring of
our genetic code may be the clue to what makes us human," Dugaiczyk said.
?During the same amount of time, humans accumulated more genetic novelties than
chimpanzees, making the human/chimpanzee genetic distance larger than that
between the chimpanzee and gorilla.?

Metaphorically speaking, Dugaiczyk said, ?Humans and primates march to the
rhythm of a drum that looks identical; the same size, shape and sound. But, the
human drum beats faster.

* Humans March To A Faster Genetic "Drummer" Than Primates, 04/08/30,
bio.com/UC Riverside


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08.03. Evolutionary Biology: Time, Space And Genomes , Nature

Excerpts: In most animals, the Hox genes ?which control development ?are
clustered together. But why? New evidence supports the idea that the
requirement for a temporal order of expression keeps the cluster intact.

(...) Genetic studies in fruitflies first showed that these genes have a major
role in producing the head-to-tail (anterior osterior) pattern of tissues
along the body axis. (...) the order of these genes along a chromosome
correlates with the anterior osterior position of the body regions they
control, and with the domains in which the genes are expressed.

* Evolutionary Biology: Time, Space And Genomes, NIPAM H. PATEL  , 04/09/02,
DOI: 10.1038/431028a, Nature 431, 28 - 29


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09. Bonemaking Protein Tied To Beak Diversity In Darwin's Finches , Science Now

Excerpts:


Pecking away. Researchers now know that a protein is key to the diversity of
beaks in Darwin's finches.

Credit: A. Abzhanov et al.




Darwin's finches, with their varied beaks, are often cited as a perfect example
of how new species arise by exploiting ecological niches. Now developmental
biologists have added a new twist to this classic story. (...) a protein
normally associated with the development of the skull and other bones is one of
the molecules that tailors the shapes of beaks.

The researchers looked at finch embryos at different points in development,
documenting when and where the genes for 10 growth factors were expressed among
the six species.

* Bonemaking Protein Tied To Beak Diversity In Darwin's Finches, Elizabeth
Pennisi  , 04/09/03, Science Now


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09.01. Molecular Shaping of the Beak , Science

Excerpts: Beak shape is a classic example of evolutionary diversification. Beak
development in chicken and duck was used to examine morphological variations
among avian species. There is only one proliferative zone in the frontonasal
mass of chickens, but two in ducks. These growth zones are associated with bone
morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) activity. (...)
The excess BMP4 resulted in longer, wider, and deeper beaks, Wu and his
colleagues report. When they did the reverse experiment, adding a gene whose
protein counteracts BMP4, the beaks ended up smaller than normal.

* Molecular Shaping of the Beak, Ping Wu , Ting-Xin Jiang , Sanong Suksaweang ,
Randall Bruce Widelitz , Cheng-Ming Chuong

, 04/09/03, Science : 1465-1466.


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09.02. Fossils' Regenerated Appendages Tell A Tale Of Escalating Predation ,
Science Now

Excerpts:


Life and limb. Crinoids fossilized while regrowing damaged arms (arrow) bear
witness to ancient dangers.

Credit: Forest J. Gahn




By counting the chewed-off arms on fossil crinoids, researchers have shown that
these filter-feeding cousins of starfish suffered ever fiercer attacks during a
period when fish and other major predators were diversifying.(...)

Just as swords inspired the invention of chain mail, the history of life hints
at many arms races between predators and prey. But with the remnants of the
carnage long turned to stone, it can be difficult to prove that the evolution
of bigger teeth, for instance, actually did encourage the evolution of defenses
such as thicker armor.

* Fossils' Regenerated Appendages Tell A Tale Of Escalating Predation, Erik
Stokstad  , 04/09/03, Science Now


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10. Cell Biology: Regulated Self-Cannibalism , Nature

Excerpts: Cells consume parts of themselves to survive starvation and during
development. But how do they control this process of self-eating so that it
begins at the right time and does not end up killing the cell?
(...), when a cell is deprived of nutrients it will degrade some of its own
constituents to stay alive. It does this by the process of autophagy
?literally, 'self-eating'.(...)
How does a cell or organism sense its environment and trigger an appropriate
signal to induce or suppress autophagy?

* Cell Biology: Regulated Self-Cannibalism, Daniel J. Klionsky  , 04/09/02,
DOI: 10.1038/431031a, Nature 431, 31 - 32


_________________________________________________________________

10.01. Cancer: Cell Survival Guide , Nature

Excerpts: A jaded observer might consider the cancer research field near
maturity and surprising new results improbable. But work on the protein
netrin-1 shows that unforeseen insights into cancer can still occur.

Named from the Sanskrit word for 'one who guides', the netrin-1 protein was
discovered because of its ability to direct the migration of axons in the
developing spinal cord. The functions of netrin proteins in axon guidance and
neural cell migration have consequently received much attention (...). But
(...) netrin-1 might offer unanticipated guidance for the cancer field as well.

* Cancer: Cell Survival Guide , Eric R. Fearon , Kathleen R. Cho  , 04/09/02,
DOI: 10.1038/431035a, Nature 431, 35 - 36


_________________________________________________________________

10.02. MIT Team Explains Yin-Yang Of Ginseng , bio.com

Excerpts: Conflicting scientific articles report that ginseng can both promote
the growth of blood vessels (...) and stymie that process. The latter is
important because preventing the formation of blood vessels can be enlisted
against cancer. (...)

Chemical fingerprints of four different varieties of ginseng--American,
Chinese, Korean and Sanqi--show that each has different proportions of two key
ingredients. (...) preponderance of one ingredient has positive effects on the
growth of blood vessels; more of the other component tips the scale the other
way.

* MIT Team Explains Yin-Yang Of Ginseng, 04/08/30, bio.com/MIT


_________________________________________________________________

11. Brain Scans Reveal Differences In Dyslexics Who Speak Different Types Of
Languages , Science Now

Excerpts:


Juggling languages. Understanding Chinese involves different brain regions
(red) than understanding English (green) does. Chinese speakers with dyslexia
have more brain activity in some areas (blue) than do dyslexic English
speakers.

Credit: Wai Ting Siok




(...) the kind of language you learn can influence how language areas in the
brain develop. (...) interventions for reading disorders such as dyslexia may
need to be modified for various languages.

Dyslexia seems to be rooted in the left temporoparietal region of the brain, at
least for native speakers of alphabet-based languages (...). Reading such
languages involves converting letters into sounds. Reading a symbol-based
language, such as Chinese, is vastly different; it requires remembering what
each character looks like, how it is pronounced, and what it means.

* Brain Scans Reveal Differences In Dyslexics Who Speak Different Types Of
Languages, Rachel Ehrenberg  , 04/09/01, Science Now


_________________________________________________________________

11.01. Pollution Triggers Bizarre Behaviour In Animals , NewScientist

Excerpts: Hyperactive fish, stupid frogs, fearless mice and seagulls that fall
over. It sounds like a weird animal circus, but this is no freak show. Animals
around the world are increasingly behaving in bizarre ways, and the cause is
environmental pollution. (...)
Low concentrations of these pollutants are changing both the social and mating
behaviours of a raft of species. This potentially poses a far greater threat to
survival than, for example, falling sperm counts caused by higher chemical
concentrations.

* Pollution Triggers Bizarre Behaviour In Animals, Andy Coghlan  , 04/09/01,
New Scientist


_________________________________________________________________

12. Scattering Poop Around Their Nests Helps Burrowing Owls Lure Tasty Beetles
, Science Now

Excerpts:


Waiting for a bite. A burrowing owl stands guard over dung piles that help
attract tasty beetles.

Credit: Ronald J. Wolff




Burrowing owls consume all manner of small creatures, but dung beetles are a
staple. Could dung help lure the owls' favorite food? (...)The remains of the
owls' meals showed that the birds ate 10 times as many dung beetles when their
burrows were surrounded by cow manure. "The owls spend a lot of time standing
right by their burrows," Levey says. "It's like they've got a line in the water
like fishermen, and they're sitting waiting for something to come.?
* Scattering Poop Around Their Nests Helps Burrowing Owls Lure Tasty Beetles,
Kathleen Wong  , 04/09/01, Science Now


_________________________________________________________________

12.01. Flying Fox Favours Tunnel Vision , BBC News

Excerpts:


The colony helps to sustain its environment



A colony of Livingstone's fruit bats, whose wingspan can reach 5ft (1.5m), has
been kept at Jersey zoo in the Channel Islands for the last 12 years.
A number of the bats have now started to fly through a purpose-built tunnel in
their enclosure in search of food.
The zoo, HQ of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, is one of only two
global sites where the bats are kept.
Livingstone's fruit bat (...), is thought to be at risk of imminent extinction
because of the loss of its forest habitat.

* Flying Fox Favours Tunnel Vision, Alex Kirby  , 04/09/04, BBC News


_________________________________________________________________

13. Single Gene Removes Sex Differences In Mice Brains , NewScientist

Excerpts: Significant structural differences in the brains of males and females
may result from selective cell death orchestrated by just a single gene during
early development, (...).
Extensive research in rats has demonstrated that these differences are
determined by the presence or absence of the hormone testosterone in early
life.
If a male rat is castrated shortly after birth, its BNST and AVPV will develop
in the female pattern. Conversely, if a female rat pup is treated with
testosterone its adult brain will be indistinguishable from a male .

* Single Gene Removes Sex Differences In Mice Brains, Peter Farley  , 04/08/31,
New Scientist


_________________________________________________________________

13.01. Theoretical Biology: Mushrooms In Cyberspace , Nature

Excerpts: Mushrooms arise largely from the inflation of pre-existing cells,
which in part accounts for the startling speed with which they can appear. But
what developmental processes are responsible for shaping those cells first into
the primordial mushroom structure and then into the full-grown 'fruiting body'
itself? (...) They have grown cyber fungi like the mushroom shown here. As well
as creating primordial fruiting bodies whose cell arrangements mimic the real
things, the authors' computer models provide predictions that can be tested.

* Theoretical Biology: Mushrooms In Cyberspace, Nicholas P. Money  , 04/09/02,
DOI: 10.1038/431032a, Nature 431, 32


_________________________________________________________________

13.02. Stem Cells From Hair Follicles Regenerate Skin And Hair In Mice ,
Science Now

Excerpts:


Cellular patch kit. Individual stem cells isolated from mouse hair follicles
can develop into normal hair-bearing skin.

Credit: C. Blanpain Et Al., Cell (2 September 2004)



In the past few years researchers have ascertained that stem cells contained in
the "bulge" of hair follicles are capable of producing both skin and hair. But
it hasn't been clear whether the bulge contains many kinds of progenitor
cells--each giving rise to a different tissue--or whether there are
"multipotent" stem cells that are capable of generating skin, hair, or
oil-producing sebaceous glands.

Now researchers at Rockefeller University in New York City say they have proven
that the cells are multipotent, (...).

* Stem Cells From Hair Follicles Regenerate Skin And Hair In Mice, Constance
Holden  , 04/09/03, Science Now


_________________________________________________________________

14. Bending Sound The 'Wrong' Way Sharpens Scans , NewScientist

Excerpts:


Negative sound refraction


Ultrasound scans could soon be much more detailed, thanks to a novel material
that can bend sound waves the "wrong" way. This property, known as negative
refraction, means the material should bring sound waves to a focus far sharper
than today's medical scanners.

Negative refraction of light was predicted in the 1970s by (...) Victor
Veselago, but it was not actually achieved until 2000.
Then in 2001, John Pendry, (...), predicted that using negative refraction in
lenses could generate images with a much higher resolution than is usually
possible

* Bending Sound The 'Wrong' Way Sharpens Scans, Justin Mullins  , 04/09/01, New
Scientist


_________________________________________________________________

14.01. Finally, a Car That Talks Back , Wired

Excerpts: Using voice-recognition and text-to-speech technology from IBM, the
2005 Acura RL, available in October, and Honda Odyssey, available in September,
will produce maps and "speak" turn-by-turn directions from the navigation
system. Drivers will also be able to make phone calls or crank up the air
conditioning, all while keeping their eyes on the road and their hands on the
wheel.(...)
She said the voice-recognition system was designed to work in the presence of
ambient sounds such as air conditioning or a racing engine.

* Finally, a Car That Talks Back, John Gartner  , 04/09/02, Wired


_________________________________________________________________

14.02. Software Solutions for Self-organizing Multimedia-Appliances , Computers
& Graphics

Excerpt: The vision of Ambient Intelligence is based on the ubiquity of
information technology, the presence of computation, communication, and
sensorial capabilities in an unlimited abundance of everyday appliances and
environments. But enabling an ensemble of devices to spontaneously act and
cooperate coherently requires software technologies that support
self-organization. (...)
See Also: ComDig 2004.18.09

* Software Solutions for Self-organizing Multimedia-Appliances, Michael
Hellenschmidt , Thomas Kirste , 2004/10, DOI: 10.1016/j.cag.2004.06.004,
Computers & Graphics 28(5):643-655
* Contributed by Carlos Gershenson


_________________________________________________________________

15. Physics And Music: Brothers In Art , Nature

Excerpts: Piers Coleman is a theoretical physicist, his brother Jaz a musician
with an unusual pedigree. Together, they want to break down boundaries between
science and the arts. (...)

Music of the Quantum was commissioned by the Institute for Complex Adaptive
Matter, a network of researchers that aims to advance condensed-matter science
(see  'Small science thinks big' ). It premiered in 2003 at Columbia University
in New York, on the weekend that the United States invaded Iraq. (...) most New
Yorkers remained glued to their TV sets.

* Physics And Music: Brothers In Art, Sarah Tomlin  , 04/09/02, DOI:
10.1038/431014a, Nature 431, 14 - 16


_________________________________________________________________

15.01. Statistical Physics: Hear The Noise , Nature

Excerpts: At the nanoscale, thermal fluctuations and noise dominate. But
instead of being a hindrance, the details of the noise itself can reveal the
physical properties of the system. (...)

In 1905, Einstein pointed out a subtle consequence of the fluctuations in
classical brownian motion: the same random forces that make a pollen particle
jitter would also cause friction (...).
(...) 'listening' to the intrinsic noise of a system in equilibrium can provide
the same information as does probing it with an external field (...).

* Statistical Physics: Hear The Noise, Simon Kos , Peter Littlewood  ,
04/09/02, DOI: 10.1038/431029a, Nature 431, 29


_________________________________________________________________

16. Earthquake Theory Shaken , Science Now

Excerpts:


San Francisco 1906. Scientists may have to rethink their ideas about when the
next "big one" will hit California.

Credit: USGS



(...)at least 30 earthquakes over the last 6000 years. (...) The result is the
most complete long-term record of activity for any fault in the world. And it
contradicts the conventional wisdom: Shorter quiet periods of less than a
century were generally followed by larger earthquakes, and longer periods of
several hundred years preceded smaller quakes. Although this appears
counterintuitive, the larger pattern is more logical. It appears that strain is
not released entirely with each earthquake but continues to accumulate through
four or five or more earthquake cycles.

* Earthquake Theory Shaken, Betsy Mason  , 04/09/03, Science Now


_________________________________________________________________

16.01. Mission Inside The Fault Zone , BBC News

Excerpts: (...) researchers are aiming to drill directly into the heart of the
San Andreas fault.

The main shaft has already reached a depth of about one and half miles (2.5km)
and the drill-bit has now been turned to run at an angle, to penetrate the
fault from the side.

Nothing so ambitious has ever been attempted before and the excitement among
the scientists is palpable.

The aim of the Safod (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) project is to
gather as much data as possible before, during and after earthquakes.

* Mission Inside The Fault Zone, David Shukman  , 04/09/04, BBC News


_________________________________________________________________

16.02. Planet Formation: The Core Problem , Nature

Excerpts: Controversy over shock-wave experiments on the compression of
hydrogen has broad implications ?for understanding the cores of Jupiter and
Saturn, and even the formation of extrasolar planets.

In July of this year, NASA announced that it will fund further study of a
proposed mission to Jupiter, as part of its New Frontiers programme1. A prime
objective of this orbiter mission, called Juno, would be to measure Jupiter's
gravitational and magnetic fields at very close range, to discern whether the
planet has a dense core.

* Planet Formation: The Core Problem, William B. Hubbard  , 04/09/02, DOI:
10.1038/431032b, Nature 431, 32 - 33


_________________________________________________________________

17. Tough Decisions - How And When You Make Them Says A Lot About You ,
Darwinmag.com

Excerpts: While many managers feel their bosses defer the tough calls, the
majority of them say they themselves deal with the difficult decisions
immediately. In a nationwide survey over a base of 2,000 senior executives and
managers, NFI Research found that 62 percent of executives and managers deal
with making the tough decision at work right away, and 58 percent after getting
opinions from others.

However, a third of those same businesspeople say their superiors defer the
tough calls and a third wait until absolutely necessary. Almost 40 percent of
managers say their superiors defer the tough decisions, while a fourth of them
say their bosses either avoid the tough decision or focus on those that are
easier.

* Tough Decisions - How And When You Make Them Says A Lot About You, Chuck
Martin  , 04/09/01, Darwinmag.com


_________________________________________________________________

17.01. Good Schools or Bad? Conflicting Ratings Leave Parents Baffled , NY
Times

Excerpts: The conflict between state and federal evaluations has confused
hundreds of communities (...). In Florida, Gov. Jeb Bush announced that the
state had rated more than two-thirds of Florida's 3,100 schools as
high-performing. But three-quarters were rated as low-performing under the
federal law.

(...)

The mixed messages are creating headaches for hundreds of thousands of American
parents considering whether to transfer their children, an option available
when a school is declared low-performing for two years in a row because it
missed the targets of the federal law, (...).
These divergent evaluations indicate a need for more coherent assessment
methods, which act as evolutionary fitness parameters that guide school
children as complex adaptive agents in the educational system.

* Good Schools or Bad? Conflicting Ratings Leave Parents Baffled, Sam Dillon  ,
04/09/05, NYTimes


_________________________________________________________________

18. Denying the Troops a Secret Ballot , NY Times

Excerpts: Members of the military will be allowed to vote this year by faxing
or e-mailing their ballots - after waiving their right to a secret ballot.
Beyond this fundamentally undemocratic requirement, the Electronic Transmission
Service, as it's known, has far too many problems to make it reliable, starting
with the political partisanship of the contractor running it. The Defense
Department is making matters worse by withholding basic information about the
service, (...).
The Defense Department is encouraging soldiers to use absentee ballots or fax
votes (...).
Editor's Note: We were told at school that communist Eastern Germany was not a
democracy because there voters had the option of waiving their right to a
secret ballot. As a result whole communities would openly waive their rights
and joyously and openly vote for the communist party. Whoever dared to insist
on the right for a secret ballot was immediately denounced to be an enemy of
the communist state.

* Denying the Troops a Secret Ballot, 04/09/03, NYTimes


_________________________________________________________________

19. Complex Challenges: Global Terroist Networks





_________________________________________________________________

19.01. Mr. Bush and the Truth About Terror , NY Times

Excerpts: President Bush was absolutely right when he said it was impossible to
win a war against terrorism - it's like announcing we can win a war against
violence. Terrorism can only be minimized and controlled, and that can be done
only with a worldwide strategy, joined by all of the world's sensible and
peaceful nations. (...)
The chances of a serious dialogue about terror took a blow, of course, when Mr.
Bush retracted his completely sensible statement about terrorism after the
Kerry-Edwards campaign attacked it.

* Mr. Bush and the Truth About Terror, 04/09/02, NYTimes


_________________________________________________________________

19.02. Pakistan Dismisses US Contention Of Progress In Bin Laden Hunt , Boston
Globe

Excerpts: Pakistani officials dismissed a top US counterterrorism official's
contention of progress in the hunt for Osama bin Laden, saying yesterday that
Pakistan does not have any information on the Al Qaeda leader's whereabouts.

The top government spokesman, Sheikh Rashid Ahmed, said the recent comments
about bin Laden by Joseph Cofer Black, the US State Department coordinator for
counterterrorism, were a "political statement." (...)

Asked whether concrete progress had been made during the past two months in
capturing the world's most-wanted fugitive, Black said, "Yes, I would say
this."

* Pakistan Dismisses US Contention Of Progress In Bin Laden Hunt, Matthew
Pennington  , 04/09/07, Boston Globe/AP


_________________________________________________________________

19.03. Putin Refuses To Talk With 'Child Killers' , CBC News

Excerpts: Russian President Vladimir Putin fired back at suggestions from
Western leaders that he should negotiate with Chechen separatists in the wake
of the Beslan school siege that left 335 dead.

In an interview with Britain's Guardian newspaper, Putin asked how it is
possible to negotiate with heavily armed militants, like those involved in the
school hostage taking.

He accused western leaders of applying a double standard when it comes to
terrorism. (...)
"No one has a moral right to tell us to talk to child killers," Putin said.

* Putin Refuses To Talk With 'Child Killers', 04/09/07, CBC News


_________________________________________________________________

20. Links & Snippets





_________________________________________________________________

20.01. Other Publications



- Most Heart Attacks are Easily Predictable, 2004/08/29, Reuters
- Does Telomere Elongation in Cloned Organisms Lead to a Longer Lifespan if
Cancer is Considered?, M. Masa , S. Cebrat , D. Stauffer , 2004/08/30, arXiv,
DOI: q-bio.PE/0408026
- Mathematics, Biology, and Physics: Interactions and Interdependence, Michael
C. Mackey , Moises Santillan , 2004/09/01, arXiv, DOI: q-bio.OT/0409001
- Fast Simulation of Multicomponent Dynamic Systems, Boris D. Lubachevsky ,
2004/05/22, arXiv, DOI: cs.DS/0405077
- The Number and Probability of Canalizing Functions, Winfried Just , Ilya
Shmulevich , John Konvalina , 2004/08/27, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena,
Article in Press, Corrected Proof, DOI: 10.1016/j.physd.2004.07.002
- Are Children Able To Distinguish Among The Concepts Of Aloneness, Loneliness,
And Solitude?, E. Galanaki , Sep. 2004, International Journal of Behavioral
Development, DOI: 10.1080/01650250444000153
- Social Networks And Crime Decisions: The Role Of Social Structure In
Facilitating Delinquent Behavior, A. C.-Armengol  , Y. Zenou , Aug. 2004,
International Economic Review, DOI: 10.1111/j.0020-6598.2004.00292.x
- An On-The-Job Search Model Of Crime, Inequality, And Unemployment, K. Burdett
  , R. Lagos  , R. Wright , Aug. 2004, International Economic Review, DOI:
10.1111/j.0020-6598.2004.00283.x
- Not By Bread Alone: Symbolic Loss, Trauma, And Recovery In Elephant
Communities, I. G. A. Bradshaw , Jul. 2004, Society and Animals, DOI:
10.1163/1568530041446535
- It's A Dog's Life: Elevating Status From Pet To "Fur Baby" At Yappy Hour, J.
Greenebaum , Jul. 2004, Society and Animals, DOI: 10.1163/1568530041446544
- Facial Resemblance Increases The Attractiveness Of Same-Sex Faces More Than
Other-Sex Faces, L. M. DeBruine , 2004/08/31, Alphagalileo & Proceedings B
(Biological Sciences)
- Evolution Of Mammals: Lactation Helps Mothers To Cope With Unreliable Food
Supplies, S. R. X. Dall  , I. L. Boyd , 2004/08/31, Alphagalileo & Proceedings
B (Biological Sciences)
- Cannabinoid Inhibition Improves Memory In Food-Storing Birds, But With A
Cost, T. J. DeVoogd  , M. W. Shiflett  , A. Z. Rankin  , M. L. Tomaszycki ,
2004/08/31, Alphagalileo & Proceedings B (Biological Sciences)
- Cheating In Nature: Why Rotting Food Could Hold The Key, B. Allen ,
beckyallen@ntlworld.com , 2004/09/01, Alphagalileo & British Ecological Society
- "Moral Case For Iraq War" Key To Initial Public Support - Research, B. Gammon
becky.gammon@esrc.ac.uk , 2004/09/03, Alphagalileo & Economic and Social
Research Council (ESRC)
- Identifying Tick Genes Could Halt Disease, Bioterrorism Threat, 2004/09/03,
ScienceDaily & Purdue University
- The Internet As Distributor And Mirror Of Religious And Ritual Knowledge, O.
Krueger , Jun. 2004, Asian Journal of Social Science, DOI:
10.1163/1568531041705077
- China's Competitive Performance: A Threat To East Asian Manufactured
Exports?, S. Lall  , M. Albaladejo , Sep. 2004, online 2004/07/17, World
Development, DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2004.03.006
- Proposing The Content Perception Theory For The Online Content Industry - A
Structural Equation Modeling, K.-F. Peng  , Y.-W. Fan  , T.-A. Hsu , Jun. 2004,
Industrial Management & Data Systems, DOI: 10.1108/02635570410543780
- Mysterious Signals From 1000 Light Years Away, Eugenie Samuel Reich  ,
04/09/01, New Scientist
- Could Space Signal Be Alien Contact?, 04/09/02,







Reuters
- Wider FBI Probe Of Pentagon Leaks Includes Chalabi , Robin Wright , Thomas E.
Ricks , Washington Post  , 04/09/03
- Caller ID Spoofing Service Debuts, Paul Travis , 04/09/01, InformationWeek,
Star38's service disguises who is making the call but will only be sold to
collection agencies, private investigators, and law-enforcement personnel.
- Physical Limits to Communication, Seth Lloyd , Vittorio Giovannetti , Lorenzo
Maccone , 04/09/03, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 100501
- Bloch-Front Turbulence in a Periodically Forced Belousov-Zhabotinsky
Reaction, Bradley Marts , Aric Hagberg , Ehud Meron , Anna L. Lin  , 04/09/03,
Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 108305
- Botany: A New Self-Pollination Mechanism, Yingqiang Wang , Dianxiang Zhang ,
Susanne S. Renner , Zhongyi Chen , 04/09/02, Nature 431, 39 - 40.Pollen grains
from most flowering plants are transported by wind or animals and deposited on
the receptive surface of the stigma of a different individual, but
self-pollination is also common., DOI: 10.1038/431039b
- Problems Abound in Election System, Outmoded Machinery Is Still Widespread,
Jo Becker , Dan Keating , 04/09/05, Washington Post
- Pakistan Found to Aid Iran Nuclear Efforts, David E. Sange  , 04/09/02,
NYTimes
- Coupled Oscillator Systems Of Cultured Cardiac Myocytes: Fluctuation And
Scaling Properties, Mitsuru Yoneyama , Koichi Kawahara  , 04/08, Phys. Rev. E
70, 021904
- Spatiotemporal Structures In A Model With Delay And Diffusion, M. Bestehorn ,
E. V. Grigorieva , S. A. Kaschenko  , 04/08, Phys. Rev. E 70, 026202
- Noise-Aided Synchronization Of Coupled Chaotic Electrochemical Oscillators,
Istv  Z. Kiss , John L. Hudson , J. Escalona , P. Parmananda  , 04/08, Phys.
Rev. E 70, 026210
- Heart Remodels Itself After Coronary Treatment, 04/09/06, Reuters
- PHYSICS: Crystalline Electron Pairs, Marcel Franz

, 04/09/03, Science : 1410-1411
- Targeting Apoptotic Pathways in Cancer Cells, Catherine Denicourt  , Steven
F. Dowdy
, 04/09/03, Science : 1411-1413
- Bonemaking Protein Shapes Beaks of Darwin's Finches, Elizabeth Pennisi
, 04/09/03, Science : 1383
- 400-Million-Year-Old Wounds Reveal a Time When Predators Romped, Erik
Stokstad
, 04/09/03, Science : 1386
- Making Sense of Tourette's, Steve Olson
, 04/09/03, Science : 1390-1392
- Cancer Flip-Flop: Gene acts in both proliferation and control of growth,
Scientists have identified what might be a new class of cancer-controlling
genes that alternates between halting and promoting cancer.
- Cancer Flip-Flop: Gene acts in both proliferation and control of growth,
Scientists have identified what might be a new class of cancer-controlling
genes that alternates between halting and promoting cancer.



_________________________________________________________________

20.02. Webcast Announcements




The 4th Intl Workshop on Meta-synthesis and Complex System, Beijing, China,
04/07/22-23


Intl Conf on Complex Networks: Structure, Function and Processes, Kolkata,
India, 04/06/27-30


 From Autopoiesis to Neurophenomenology: A Tribute to Francisco Varela
(1946-2001), Paris, France, 2004/06/18-20



ECC8 Experimental Chaos Conference, Florence, Italy,
  04/06/14-17



Evolutionary Epistemology, Language, and Culture, Brussels, Belgium,
04/05/26-28


International Conference on Complex Systems 2004, Boston, 04/05/16-21


Life, a Nobel Story, Brussels, Belgium, 04/04/28


Nonlinear Dynamics and Statistical Mechanics Days, Brussels, Belgium,
04/04/26-27


Science Education Forum for Chinese Language Culture, Panel Discussion, Taipei,
Taiwan, 04/05/01


Biologically Inspired Approaches to Advanced Information Technology, ,
Lausanne,Switzerland, 04/01/29-30


Nonlinear Dynamics And Chaos: Lab Demonstrations, Strogatz, Steven H.,
Internet-First University Press, 1994

World Economic Forum 2004, Davos, Switzerland   Riding the Next Democratic
Wave, Al-Thani, Khan, Vike-Freiberga, Wade, Soros, Zakaria, World Economic
Forum, 04/01/25
  The Future of Global Interdependence, Kharrazi, Held, Owens, Shourie, Annan,
Martin, Schwab, World Economic Forum, 04/01/25  Why Victory Against Terrorism
Demands Shared Values

  CODIS 2004, International Conference On Communications, Devices And
Intelligent Systems, 2004 Calcutta, India, 04/01/09-10 EVOLVABILITY &
INTERACTION: Evolutionary Substrates of Communication, Signaling, and
Perception in the Dynamics of Social Complexity, London, UK, 03/10/08-10 The
Semantic Web and Language Technology - Its Po tential and Practicalities,
Bucharest, Romania, 03/07/28-08/08 ECAL 2003, 7th European Conference on
Artificial Life, Dortmund, Germany, 03/09/14-17 New Santa Fe Institute
President About His Vision for SFI's Future Role, (Video, Santa Fe, NM,
03/06/04) SPIE's 1st Intl Symp on Fluctuations and Noise, Santa Fe, NM,
2003/06/01-04 NAS Sackler Colloquium on Mapping Knowledge Domains, Video/Audio
Report, 03/05/11 13th Ann Intl Conf, Soc f Chaos Theory in Psych & Life
Sciences, Boston, MA, USA, 2003/08/08-10 CERN Webcast Service, Streamed videos
of Archived Lectures and Live Events Dean LeBaron's Archive of Daily Video
Commentary, Ongoing Since February 1998 Edge Videos




_________________________________________________________________

20.03. Conference & Call for Papers Announcements


Gabriele Leidloff, Ugly Casting 1.4 , Berlin, Germany, 04/08/19-10/08

  Dynamic
  Ontology,
An Inquiry into Systems, Emergence, Levels of Reality,
  and Forms of Causality, Trento, Italy,
  04/09/08-11

  9th
  Intl Conf on the Simulation and Synthesis of Living Systems
  (ALIFE9), Boston, Massachusetts, 04/09/12-15

  Dynamics Days 2004, XXIV Annual Conf
,
Palma de Mallorca, Spain, 04/09/13-17

   II. Socrates Workshop on Chaotic Systems,
Maribor, Slovenia, 04/09/13-17

   Inquiries, Indices and Incommensurabilities: Managing Emergence, Complexity
and Organization,
Washington, DC, 04/09/18-19

  Neuroeconomics 2004, Charleston, SC, 04/09/16-19

  New Economic Windows 2004: Complexity Hints for Economic Policy, Salerno,
Italy, 04/09/16-18

  The
Verhulst 200 on Chaos, Brussels, BELGIUM, 04/09/16-18

  The
  8th Intl Conf on Parallel Problem Solving from Nature
  (PPSN VIII), Birmingham, UK, 04/09/18-22

  The
  Nonlinear Waves in Fluids: Recent Advances and Modern Applications, Udine,
Italy, 04/09/18-22

  XVII Brazilian
  Symposium on Artificial Intelligence, Sao Luis, Maranhao -
  Brazil, 04/09/22-24

  3rd Natll Conf on Systems Science ,
Trento (Italy), 04/10/07-09

   TEDMED Conference ,
Charleston SC, 04/10/12-15

  Intl Workshop On Bifurcations In Nonsmooth And Hybrid Dynamical Systems  ,
Milano (Italy), 04/10/21-22

  Wolfram
  Technology Conference, Champaign, Illinois,
  04/10/21-23

  6th Intl Conf on Electronic Commerce
ICEC'2004: Towards A New Services Landscape,  Delft, The Netherlands,
04/10/25-27

   Complexity and Philosophy Workshop - 2-Day Conference ,  Rio de Janeiro,
04/11


ICDM '04: The Fourth IEEE Intl Conf on Data Mining, Brighton, UK, 04/11/01-04

Denaturing Darwin: International Conference on Evolution and Organization
, Amersfoort, The Netherlands, 04/11/12-14


  The 7th Asia-Pacific Complex Systems Conference,  Queensland, Australia,
04/12/06-10

  17th Australian Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence,  Queensland,
Australia, 04/12/06-10

Cellular Computing Symposium, U Warwick
(UK), 04/12/09-10

  International Conference On Computational Intelligence (Icci 2004) ,
Istanbul, Turkey, 04/12/15-17


  Kondratieff Waves, Warfare And World Security, NATO Advanced Research
Workshop
, Covilh? Portugal, 05/02/14-17



5th Creativity And Cognition Conference, London.UK, 05/04/12-15

  Powders & Grains 2005, Stuttgart, Germany, 05/06/18-22

  Workshop on Complexity and Policy Analysis, Cork, Ireland, 05/06/22-24


18th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations (ICNF 2005), Salamanca,
Spain, 05/09/19-23



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