ժ NO2004.24


Complexity Digest 2004.24

Archive: http://www.comdig.org, European Mirror: http://www.comdig.de Asian
Mirror: http://www.phil.pku.edu.cn/resguide/comdig/ (Chinese GB-Code) "I think
the next century will be the century of complexity." Stephen Hawking

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Content:

01. Universe Started With Hiss, Not Bang, New Scientist
02. How Google Took the Work Out of Selling Advertising, NY Times
02.01. Social Networks And Loss Of Capital, Social Networks
02.02. Robotic Rock-Climber Takes Its First Steps, New Scientist
03. Dog's Verbal Tricks Probe Origin Of Language, New Scientist
03.01. A Dog of Many Words, Science Now
03.02. Collie Dog's Word Power Impresses, BBC News
03.03. Old Dog Learns New Tricks, Natue Science update
03.04. Word Learning in a Domestic Dog: Evidence for "Fast Mapping", Science
04. Animal Behavior: Eavesdropping On Bats, Nature
04.01. Locust Swarms May Spiral Into Plague, New Scientist
05. Breaking the Sod: Humankind, History, and Soil, Science
05.01. Ecology in the Underworld, Science
05.02. Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food
Security, Science
05.03. Interactions and Self-Organization in the Soil-Microbe Complex, Science
06. Multi-agent Simulations and Ecosystem Management: A Review, Ecological
Modelling
06.01. Ecology Drives The Worldwide Distribution Of Human Diseases,
Alphagalileo
06.02. Universal Mortality Law and Immortality, arXiv
07. Brain Learns Like A Robot, Nature
07.01. The Wholes That Are Greater Than The Sum Of Their Parts In Mathematics
Education, J. Math. Behav.
07.02. Why Do U.S. And Chinese Students Think Differently In Mathematical
Problem Solving?, J. Math. Behav.
08. Human Subjects Play Mind Games, Washington University in St. Louis News &
Information
08.01. An Eye On The Tongue, ScienceDaily
09. Some Brain Areas May Doze More Deeply Than Others, Science Now
09.01. The Sleeping Brain, NPR TOTN
09.02. Memory Fails You After Severe Stress, NewScientist
10. Loss Of Circadian Genes Results In Epilepsy, ScienceDaily
11. Complex Machine Carved Ancient Rings, Nature
11.01. China Had First Complex Machines, BBC News
11.02. Conflicting Cultures and Innovation, MIT Sloan Management Review
12. Self-Assembly Made Easy, Physics Web
12.01. Nanophysics: A Step Up To Self-Assembly, Nature
12.02. Molecular Medicine: The Writing Is On The Vessel Wall, Nature
13. Venezuelan Recall Is in Dispute Even Before the Vote, NY Times
13.01. Gambling on Voting, NY Times
13.02. Gambling on Voting, NY Times
14. Appealing a Death Sentence Based on Future Danger, NY Times
14.01. Meager Evaluations Make It Hard to Find Out What Works, Science
14.02. Ruined Moments In Your Life: How Good Are The Approximations?,
Insurance: Math.& Econ.
15. Choice, Consent, And The Legitimacy Of Market Transactions, Econ. & Phil.
16. An Oil Enigma: Production Falls Even as Reserves Rise, NY Times
17. This Spy for Rent, NY Times
18. Memos on Torture Conflict with Bush Legal Policies, NPR
18.01. Iraq Abuse 'Came From US Policy', BBC News
18.02. Use of Dogs to Scare Prisoners Was Approved, Washington Post
18.03. A Look Behind the 'Wire' At Guantanamo, Washington Post
18.04. Iraq Tactics Have Long History With U.S. Interrogators, Washington Post
18.05. Guantanamo List Details Approved Interrogation Methods, Washington Post
19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Networks
19.01. The War on Terrorism: The Big Picture, Parameters
19.02. U.S. Wrongly Reported Drop in World Terrorism in 2003, NY Times
19.03. Isolation Is Not The Answer, Nature
20. Links & Snippets
20.01. Other Publications
20.02. Webcast Announcements
20.03. Conference & Call for Papers Announcements

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01. Universe Started With Hiss, Not Bang , NewScientist

Excerpts: The Universe began not with a bang but with a low moan, building into
a roar that gave way to a deafening hiss. (...).

Cosmologists do not usually think in terms of sound, but this aural picture is
a good way to think about the Universe's beginnings, (...). Whittle has
reconstructed the cosmic cacophony from data teased out over the past couple of
years from the high-resolution mapping by NASA's WMAP spacecraft of the cosmic
microwave background radiation, the afterglow of the hot early Universe.




The sound of the big bang



* Universe Started With Hiss, Not Bang, David L Chandler  , 04/06/12, New
Scientist
* AUDIO - Sound file


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02. How Google Took the Work Out of Selling Advertising , NY Times

Excerpts: Google's original way of making money, and still its largest source
of revenue, was search-driven ads. You enter, say, "vacation homes in France,"
and with its usual list of sites Google shows a list of "sponsored links" from
advertisers, who have paid to be associated with those terms.


"AdSense was really a very natural outgrowth" of this search-dependent system,
(...). (...) "Google had this great database of advertisers, and the keywords
they were interested in," he said. "But they had to wait for the searches to
happen."

* How Google Took the Work Out of Selling Advertising, James Fallows , NY Times


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02.01. Social Networks And Loss Of Capital , Social Networks

Abstract: Do social networks lower, raise, or have no effect on the probability
of loss of capital, given that an investment has been made? The probability of
loss of capital depends on due diligence and type of social tie. Investors who
fail to conduct due diligence and do not use social ties have a 79% probability
of loss of capital, (...) who conduct due diligence (and do not use social
ties) have a 49% probability. Investors with preexisting social ties to the
principals, sales representatives, or employees of the company (and do not
conduct due diligence) have a 39% probability of loss(...).

* Social Networks And Loss Of Capital, W. E. Baker wayneb@umich.edu , R. R.
Faulkner , May 2004, online 2004/03/10, DOI: 10.1016/j.socnet.2004.01.004,
Social Networks
* Contributed by Atin Das


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02.02. Robotic Rock-Climber Takes Its First Steps , NewScientist

Excerpts: A robotic mountaineer, which could one day help rescue people trapped
by earthquakes or even explore rock faces on Mars, has taken its first steps.
The spider-like robot, called Lemur, has a central body and four triple-jointed
limbs. Its gait bears a spooky resemblance to that of a human rock-climber.
Lemur can already pull itself up an irregular surface without any guidance from
a controller, although it needs to be told where the holds are first. The
ultimate goal is for Lemur to determine the best path up a cliff all by
itself.



Lemur's ascent



* Robotic Rock-Climber Takes Its First Steps, 04/06/09, New Scientist


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03. Dog's Verbal Tricks Probe Origin Of Language , NewScientist

Excerpts: With a "vocabulary" of 200 words, Rico showed exceptional ability in
retrieving specific toys when asked to fetch them.

The researchers decided to test whether Rico's ability was based on
understanding and if he could learn and remember new words. They placed a new
toy among his favourites and asked Rico to fetch it, using the unfamiliar name.
The dog nearly always did. This suggests that Rico is using a system called
"fast-mapping", which young children use to learn new words by matching new
words to new objects.

* Dog's Verbal Tricks Probe Origin Of Language, Shaoni Bhattacharya , 04/06/10,
New Scientist


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03.01. A Dog of Many Words , Science Now

Excerpts: Word learning starts with understanding the relationship between a
word and the object it stands for. Children learn words by show-and-tell, or
infer them by the process of elimination. For example, if a child is told to
fetch a fruit with an unfamiliar name from a bowl containing well-known apples
and bananas plus a novel object, chances are he or she will figure out that the
novel fruit corresponds to the new word and will remember that in the future.
This kind of learning is called fast mapping, and until now it has only been
demonstrated in children.

* A Dog of Many Words, 04/06/10, Science Now


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03.02. Collie Dog's Word Power Impresses , BBC News

Excerpts: Border collie Rico understands 200 words and can even guess what new
words could mean, say researchers.
A very smart collie dog named Rico has stunned German researchers by learning
words with the apparent flair of a young child, Science magazine reports.

Rico understands more than 200 words and can work out the meaning of new ones,
by a process of elimination.

What is more, Rico can often remember new words after a whole month - even
though he has only heard them once before, the scientists claim.

* Collie Dog's Word Power Impresses, BBC News


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03.03. Old Dog Learns New Tricks , Natue Science update

Excerpts: A German border collie has surprised scientists with his 200-word
vocabulary and uncanny knack for learning new words, shedding light on the
evolution of language.

Nine-year-old Rico knows the names of each toy in his hundred-strong collection
and can retrieve items called out to him with over 90% accuracy. He can also
learn and remember the names of unfamiliar toys after just one encounter,
putting him on a par with a three-year-old child.





Rico has a 200-word vocabulary and a knack for learning new words.


Image courtesy of Susanne Baus




* Old Dog Learns New Tricks, Helen R. Pilcher
, 04/06/11


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03.04. Word Learning in a Domestic Dog: Evidence for "Fast Mapping" , Science

Excerpts: During speech acquisition, children form quick and rough hypotheses
about the meaning of a new word after only a single exposure  process dubbed
"fast mapping." Here we provide evidence that a border collie, Rico, is able to
fast map. (...) He inferred the names of novel items by exclusion learning and
correctly retrieved those items right away as well as 4 weeks after the initial
exposure. Fast mapping thus appears to be mediated by general learning and
memory mechanisms also found in other animals and not by a language acquisition
device that is special to humans.

* Word Learning in a Domestic Dog: Evidence for "Fast Mapping", Juliane
Kaminski , Josep Call , Julia Fischer
  , 04/06/11, DOI: 10.1126/science.1097859, Science : 1682-1683


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04. Animal Behavior: Eavesdropping On Bats , Nature

Excerpts: Two investigations into bat echolocation provide striking examples of
the sophistication and the possible evolutionary and ecological consequences of
variability in call design.(...)
Today, we know that there is variation between bat species in the design of
echolocation calls, which often coincides with differences in their behaviour
and ecology.(...)
They showed how echolocation signals can diverge within a species and how this
divergence might promote sympatric speciation ?the division of one species
into two or more without a geographical barrier. This is a hot and contentious
topic in evolutionary biology.

* Animal Behavior: Eavesdropping On Bats, Brock Fenton , John Ratcliffe  ,
04/06/10, DOI: 10.1038/429612a, Nature 429, 612 - 613


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04.01. Locust Swarms May Spiral Into Plague , NewScientist

Excerpts:


Just a tonne of locusts can eat as much food as 2500 people (Image: FAO)



A much greater worry is that the insects could breed to plague proportions and
ruin the livelihoods of poor African farmers and affect food security. The last
African locust plague lasted from 1986 to 1989 and struck 40 countries.

In 2003, exceptionally wet rainy seasons in the Sahel and northern Africa meant
that the desert locust species (Schistocerca gregaria (Forskal)) was able to
breed more generations of offspring than usual, leading to a population boom.

* Locust Swarms May Spiral Into Plague, Shaoni Bhattacharya , 04/06/09, New
Scientist


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05. Breaking the Sod: Humankind, History, and Soil , Science

Excerpts:
* Breaking the Sod: Humankind, History, and Soil, J. R. McNeill  , Verena
Winiwarter
, 04/06/11, DOI: 10.1126/science.1099893, Science : 1627-1629


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05.01. Ecology in the Underworld , Science

Excerpts: In many ways the ground beneath our feet is as alien as a distant
planet. The processes occurring in the top few centimeters of Earth  surface
are the basis of all life on dry land, but the opacity of soil has severely
limited our understanding of how it functions. As creatures of the aerial
world, we have a decidedly distorted view of this nurturing underworld. For
ecologists, soil fascinates and flummoxes in equal measure. The techniques and
approaches of many branches of aboveground ecology don  translate well to the
soil environment.

* Ecology in the Underworld, Andrew Sugden , Richard Stone , Caroline Ash ,
04/06/11, Science : 1613


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05.02. Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food
Security , Science

Excerpts: The carbon sink capacity of the world's agricultural and degraded
soils is 50 to 66% of the historic carbon loss of 42 to 78 gigatons of carbon.
(...). Strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and
woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management,
(...). As well as enhancing food security, carbon sequestration has the
potential to offset fossilfuel emissions by 0.4 to 1.2 gigatons of carbon per
year, or 5 to 15% of the global fossil-fuel emissions.

* Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food Security,
R. Lal , 04/06/11, DOI: 10.1126/science.1097396, Science : 1623-1627


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05.03. Interactions and Self-Organization in the Soil-Microbe Complex , Science

Excerpts: Soil is the most complicated biomaterial on the planet. As with any
material, the physical habitat is of prime importance in determining and
regulating biological activity. However, until recently the opaque nature of
soil has meant that any interrogation of its interior architecture has been
relatively rudimentary, restricted to simple qualitative expressions of the
physical heterogeneity that fail to relate to any specific function. (...) We
introduce the concept that the soil-microbe system is self-organized and
suggest new priorities for research based on an integrative approach that
combines biochemistry and biophysics.

* Interactions and Self-Organization in the Soil-Microbe Complex, I. M. Young
, J. W. Crawford
  , 04/06/11, DOI: 10.1126/science.1097394, Science : 1634-1637


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06. Multi-agent Simulations and Ecosystem Management: A Review , Ecological
Modelling

Experpt: This paper proposes a review of the development and use of multi-agent
simulations (MAS) for ecosystem management. The use of this methodology and the
associated tools accompanies the shifts in various paradigms on the study of
ecological complexity. Behavior and interactions are now key issues for
understanding and modeling ecosystem organization, and models are used in a
constructivist way. MAS are introduced conceptually and are compared with
individual-based modeling approaches.

* Multi-agent Simulations and Ecosystem Management: A Review, F. Bousquet , C.
Le Page , 2004-05-25, DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2004.01.011, Ecological
Modelling, Article in Press, Corrected Proof
* Contributed by Carlos Gershenson


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06.01. Ecology Drives The Worldwide Distribution Of Human Diseases ,
Alphagalileo

Excerpts: Mounting evidence suggests that ecological and climatic conditions
influence the emergence, spread, and recurrence of infectious diseases. Global
climate change is likely to aggravate climate-sensitive diseases in
unpredictable ways. (...) address the influence of ecological factors on the
biological diversity and distribution of parasitic and infectious diseases.
After compiling epidemiological data on 332 different human pathogens across
224 countries, Guernier et al. used sophisticated statistical modeling methods
to identify and characterize the influence of a number of potential
contributing factors on species richness. They found that climatic factors are
the most important determinant of the global distribution of human pathogens.

* Ecology Drives The Worldwide Distribution Of Human Diseases, M. Patterson
mpatterson@plos.org , 2004/06/09, Alphagalileo
* Contributed by Atin Das


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06.02. Universal Mortality Law and Immortality , arXiv

Abstract:: Well protected human and laboratory animal populations with abundant
resources are evolutionary unprecedented. Physical approach, which takes
advantage of their extensively quantified mortality, establishes that its
dominant fraction yields the exact law, which is universal for all animals from
yeast to humans. Singularities of the law demonstrate new kind of stepwise
adaptation. The law proves that universal mortality is an evolutionary
byproduct, which at any given age is reversible, independent of previous life
history, and disposable. Life expectancy may be extended, arguably to
immortality, by minor biological amendments in the animals. Indeed, in
nematodes with a small number of perturbed genes and tissues it increased
6-fold (to 430 years in human terms), with no apparent loss in health and
vitality. The law relates universal mortality to specific processes in cells
and their genetic regulation.

* Universal Mortality Law and Immortality, Mark Ya. Azbel' , 2004-05-29, DOI:
q-bio.PE/0405025, arXiv
* Contributed by Carlos Gershenson


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07. Brain Learns Like A Robot , Nature

Excerpts: After a few trials, subjects were subconsciously able to predict the
arrangements that spelled trouble. As they learned, key regions of their brain
lit up. The research is published in this week's Nature.

One illuminated area, the insula cortex, helps to process emotions. Another,
known as the ventral striatum, is well known as the brain's motivation centre.
But this is the first time they have been implicated in the ability to learn
good from bad.

The trials mimic our ability to use conflicting experiences to form value
judgments.

* Brain Learns Like A Robot, Tanguy Chouard
, 04/06/10


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07.01. The Wholes That Are Greater Than The Sum Of Their Parts In Mathematics
Education , J. Math. Behav.

Abstract: This paper presents a study on employing different types of
cooperative learning (CL) settings in mathematics teacher education based on
multiple research data. The study analyzes mechanisms in which CL contributes
to the development of teacher knowledge of three kinds: subject matter
knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and curricular content knowledge. Two
wholes, which are greater than the sum of their parts, are analyzed in this
paper. The first is a course whose design combines different CL settings, hence
enhances different mechanisms for teachers' professional development. The
second whole, teachers' "collaborative mind," is presented as an outcome of the
first.

* The Wholes That Are Greater Than The Sum Of Their Parts: Employing
Cooperative Learning In Mathematics Teachers' Education, R. Leikin
rozal@construct.haifa.ac.il , 23:2, 2004, online 2004/04/27, DOI:
10.1016/j.jmathb.2004.03.006, The Journal of Mathematical Behavior
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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07.02. Why Do U.S. And Chinese Students Think Differently In Mathematical
Problem Solving? , J. Math. Behav.

Abstract: (...) examined the impact of early algebra learning and teachers'
beliefs on U.S. and Chinese students' thinking. The first study examined the
extent to which U.S. and Chinese students' selection of solution strategies and
representations is related to their opportunity to learn algebra. The second
study examined the impact of teachers' beliefs on their students' thinking
through analyzing U.S. and Chinese teachers' scoring of student responses. For
the Chinese sample, students rarely used visual representations whether or not
they had formally learned algebraic concepts. (...) Chinese teachers expect 6th
graders to use the generalized strategies to solve problems while U.S. teachers
do not.

* Why Do U.S. And Chinese Students Think Differently In Mathematical Problem
Solving? Impact Of Early Algebra Learning And Teachers' Beliefs, J. Cai
jcai@math.udel.edu , 23:2, 2004, online 2004/04/27, DOI:
10.1016/j.jmathb.2004.03.004, The Journal of Mathematical Behavior
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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08. Human Subjects Play Mind Games , Washington University in St. Louis News &
Information

Excerpts:


WUSTL researchers have shown it possible to play video games with your brain,
not your hands



(...) placed an electronic grid atop patients' brains to gather motor signals
that enable patients to play a computer game using only the signals from their
brains.
The use of a grid atop the brain to record brain surface signals is a
brain-machine interface technique that uses electrocorticographic (ECoG)
activity-data taken invasively right from the brain surface. It is an
alternative to the status quo, used frequently studying humans, called
electroencephalographic activity (EEG) - data taken non-invasively by
electrodes outside the brain on the skull.

* Human Subjects Play Mind Games, Tony Fitzpatrick  , 04/06/09, Washington
University in St. Louis News & Information


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08.01. An Eye On The Tongue , ScienceDaily

Excerpts: Sitting blindfolded with a device equipped with 144 pixels in his
mouth (...) recognize that the system developed (...) to allow blind people to
"see with their tongue" appears strangely effective. In just the first few
minutes, the subject is able to build up a fairly clear picture of the letter
"T" placed in various positions and transmitted by electrical impulses to the
device on his tongue. "But for people born blind, the cerebral cortex, which is
normally used for vision, is reactivated by this device. The electrical
activity, recorded by a scan, is very clear about this.

* An Eye On The Tongue, 2004/06/03, ScienceDaily & University Of Montreal
* Contributed by Atin Das


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09. Some Brain Areas May Doze More Deeply Than Others , Science Now

Excerpts:


Zzzzzz. Deep sleep in part of the brain (white dots) seems to enhance
performance on a test of hand-eye coordination.

CREDIT: HUBER ET AL., NATURE



In the compensating group, slow waves emanating from the brain area exercised
by the test were an average of 25% stronger (...). And the compensating group
scored an average of 11% better the next morning when tested on performance on
the original task. This improvement vanished, however, when the researchers
repeated the experiment in another group of subjects who didn't sleep between
the training and testing periods, (...).

The research demonstrates (...) that slow wave strength increases in localized
areas of the brain after training and helps consolidate memory (...).

* Some Brain Areas May Doze More Deeply Than Others, 04/06/07, Scence Now


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09.01. The Sleeping Brain , NPR TOTN

Excerpts: Do different parts of the brain sleep at different times?

* The Sleeping Brain , Giulio Tononi , 04/06/11, NPR TOTN



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09.02. Memory Fails You After Severe Stress , NewScientist

Excerpts: People are woefully bad at recalling details of their own traumatic
experiences. When military personnel were subjected to threatening behaviour
during mock interrogations, most failed to identify the questioner a day or so
later, and many even got the gender wrong.


The finding casts serious doubt on the reliability of victim testimonies in
cases involving psychological trauma.


Numerous studies have questioned the accuracy of recall of traumatic events,
(...). Other studies have suggested that intense, personal experiences might
produce near photographic recollection, (...).

* Memory Fails You After Severe Stress, New Scientist


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10. Loss Of Circadian Genes Results In Epilepsy , ScienceDaily

Excerpts: A meticulous series of experiments - and the fortuitous use of a
vacuum cleaner - lead to breakthrough new insight on the genetic basis of
epilepsy. Circadian rhythms - the normal ups and downs of body rhythms - help
organize physiological processes into a 24 hour cycle (...). Scientists have
now discovered that the combined deletion of three circadian genes (...),
results in accelerated aging and severe epilepsy in mice. Owing to the roughly
95% identity of PAR bZip proteins between mice and humans, it is anticipated
that PAR bZip mutations may also underlie some forms of human epilepsy.

* Loss Of Circadian Genes Results In Epilepsy, 2004/06/08, ScienceDaily & Cold
Spring Harbor Laboratory
* Contributed by Atin Das


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11. Complex Machine Carved Ancient Rings , Nature

Excerpts:


The ring's spiral carvings were made by a complex machine.

Image © Science




Craftsmen would have run a sharp implement over a jade disc thousands of times
to create the grooves, then cut out the centre to create the ring.

The device combines the rotational movement of the turntable with the linear
motion of the needle. But historical references to compound machines that
feature two types of movement do not appear until writings from the first
century AD. Historians had thought that the jade rings were decorated by hand
or by simple machines that use a single movement, like a potter's wheel.

* Complex Machine Carved Ancient Rings, Helen R. Pilcher
, 04/06/11, Nature


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11.01. China Had First Complex Machines , BBC News

Excerpts:


Consisted of two or more machines working together

Contained a stylus suspended over a rotating turntable

Created evenly spaced grooves on a jade ring





Craftsmen in ancient China were using complex machines to work jewellery long
before such devices are traditionally thought to have been invented.(...)
The machine that carved the grooves would have linked rotational and linear
motion, perhaps using a stylus suspended over a rotating turntable, says Dr
Lu.

"The complex machine that created these spiral grooves may also be among the
ancestors of the crank in China... sculptures to have mechanised a variety of
agricultural processes such as milling and winnowing," (...).

* China Had First Complex Machines, BBC News


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11.02. Conflicting Cultures and Innovation , MIT Sloan Management Review

Excerpts: "Giving people permission to experiment and learn from experience is
essential to innovation. This de-emphasizes predicting financial outcomes in
favor of forecasting and monitoring more qualitative trends and revisiting the
assumptions underlying those forecasts...The challenge is to balance a culture
of accountability in established businesses with a culture of learning in
experimental businesses. (...) To allow new ventures to benefit from the assets
and experience available within a large corporation ?(...) - leaders must
nourish interaction between established and experimental businesses while
letting the conflicting cultures maintain their identities.

From: New Ways To Evaluate Innovative Ventures (full article available for
purchase online)

* Conflicting Cultures and Innovation, Ray Stata , Spring 2004, MIT Sloan
Management Review


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12. Self-Assembly Made Easy , Physics Web

Excerpts: Physicists in Ireland have developed a novel technique that allows
"hands-free" manipulation of mesoscale device components for the first time.
The method employs electric fields to direct the assembly of the components
into integrated systems and could be an alternative to conventional techniques
for making electronic devices (...).
Light emitting diodes and other systems that contain mesoscale components are
assembled by micro-robotic "tweezers" that pick up individual devices and place
them on pre-selected positions on a chip surface.

* Self-Assembly Made Easy, 04/06/11, Physics Web


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12.01. Nanophysics: A Step Up To Self-Assembly , Nature

Excerpts: From the beautiful snowflakes that form from a random aggregation of
water molecules, to the creation of a living organism, nature has found such
efficient means of self-assembly that, in contrast, human techniques often seem
crude. (...) By better understanding nature's methods for assembly on solid
surfaces, involving diffusion, nucleation and growth, it might be possible to
orchestrate these phenomena such that a complete computer chip consisting of
several billion transistors could assemble itself, like a complex biological
organism. (...) normal manufacturing methods will be useless.

* Nanophysics: A Step Up To Self-Assembly, Kristen Fichthorn , Matthias
Scheffler , 04/06/10, DOI: 10.1038/429617a, Nature 429, 617 - 618


_________________________________________________________________

12.02. Molecular Medicine: The Writing Is On The Vessel Wall , Nature

Excerpts: Watching blood cells move through the blood vessels of living tissues
under the microscope, researchers have learned that most of the time the cells
move rapidly with the blood flow without stopping. Sometimes, however, they
contact the walls of the vessel, slow down and roll along ?perhaps even
stopping and sticking in specific areas. (...) These proteins constitute the
writing on the vessel walls ?molecular 'addresses' that could tell circulating
blood cells where they are and what to do in specific circumstances.

* Molecular Medicine: The Writing Is On The Vessel Wall, Christopher H. Contag
, Michael H. Bachmann , 04/06/10, DOI: 10.1038/429618a, Nature 429, 618 - 619


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13. Venezuelan Recall Is in Dispute Even Before the Vote , NY Times

Excerpts: Touch-screen voting machines, which have been plagued by security and
reliability concerns in the United States, will be used in the recall vote on
President Hugo Ch ez, prompting his foes and foreign diplomats to contend that
the left-leaning government may use the equipment to manipulate the vote.

A new touch-screen system here, bought earlier this year by Mr. Ch ez's
government, uses voting machines made by the Smartmatic Corporation (...)., and
software produced by a related company, the Bizta Corporation(...). Neither
company has experience in an actual election.

* Venezuelan Recall Is in Dispute Even Before the Vote, Juan Forer , John
Schwartz


_________________________________________________________________

13.01. Gambling on Voting , NY Times

Excerpts: If election officials want to convince voters that electronic voting
can be trusted, they should be willing to make it at least as secure as slot
machines. (...) Electronic voting, by comparison, is rife with lax procedures,
security risks and conflicts of interest.


On a trip last week to the Nevada Gaming Control Board laboratory, in a state
office building off the Las Vegas Strip, we found testing and enforcement
mechanisms that go far beyond what is required for electronic voting.

* Gambling on Voting, 04/06/13, NY Times


_________________________________________________________________

13.02. Gambling on Voting , NY Times

Excerpts: If election officials want to convince voters that electronic voting
can be trusted, they should be willing to make it at least as secure as slot
machines. (...) Electronic voting, by comparison, is rife with lax procedures,
security risks and conflicts of interest.


On a trip last week to the Nevada Gaming Control Board laboratory, in a state
office building off the Las Vegas Strip, we found testing and enforcement
mechanisms that go far beyond what is required for electronic voting.

* Gambling on Voting, 04/06/13, NY Times


_________________________________________________________________

14. Appealing a Death Sentence Based on Future Danger , NY Times

Excerpts: A Texas death row inmate is claiming that jurors were wrong in
believing he would probably commit more violent acts, pointing out his peaceful
18 years spent in prison.(...)

Texas juries in capital cases must make a prediction. They may impose a death
sentence only if they find that the defendant will probably commit more violent
acts.

Other states look backward, asking juries to consider the moral blameworthiness
of the crime. Texas, which leads the nation in executions, wants to know the
future: Will the killer kill again?

* Appealing a Death Sentence Based on Future Danger, Adam Liptak , NY Times


_________________________________________________________________

14.01. Meager Evaluations Make It Hard to Find Out What Works , Science

Excerpts: The Education Department even funds a "What Works Clearinghouse" on
programs ranging from teaching math to reducing schoolyard violence. This
heightened interest in assessment stems from the massive 2001 education reform
bill--known as the No Child Left Behind Act?...). But there's a dirty little
secret behind that requirement: No program has yet met that rigorous standard,
because none has been scientifically evaluated and shown to be effective. (A
related secret is that there's no consensus on the type of evaluation studies
that are needed.)

* Meager Evaluations Make It Hard to Find Out What Works, Jeffrey Mervis ,
04/06/11, DOI: 10.1126/science.304.5677.1583, Science : 1583


_________________________________________________________________

14.02. Ruined Moments In Your Life: How Good Are The Approximations? ,
Insurance: Math.& Econ.

Abstract: In this paper we (...) compute the probability of lifetime ruin which
is the probability that a fixed retirement consumption strategy will lead to
financial insolvency under stochastic investment returns and lifetime
distribution. This problem is a variant of the classical and illustrious ruin
problem in insurance, but adapted to individual circumstances. Using equity
market parameters derived from US-based financial data we conclude that a
65-year-old retiree requires 30 times their desired annual (real) consumption
to generate a 95% probability of sustainability, which is equivalent to a 5%
probability of lifetime ruin, if the funds are invested in a well-diversified
portfolio.

* Ruined Moments In Your Life: How Good Are The Approximations?, H. Huang  , M.
A. Milevsky milevsky@yorku.ca , J. Wang , 2004/06/18, online 2004/05/06, DOI:
10.1016/j.insmatheco.2004.03.006, Insurance: Mathematics and Economics
* Contributed by Pritha Das


_________________________________________________________________

15. Choice, Consent, And The Legitimacy Of Market Transactions , Econ. & Phil.

Abstract: According to an often repeated definition, economics is the science
of individual choices and their consequences. The emphasis on choice is often
used - implicitly or explicitly - to mark a contrast between markets and the
state (...). The emphasis in economic theory on freedom of choice in the market
sphere suggests that legitimization in the market sphere is "automatic" (...).
In this paper, I shall question the alleged dichotomy between legitimization in
the market and in the state. I shall argue that it is the result of a
conflation of choice and consent in economics (...).

* Choice, Consent, And The Legitimacy Of Market Transactions, F. Peter , Apr.
2004, online 2004/05/04, DOI: 10.1017/S0266267104001233, Economics and
Philosophy
* Contributed by Pritha Das


_________________________________________________________________

16. An Oil Enigma: Production Falls Even as Reserves Rise , NY Times

Excerpts: For six consecutive years, ChevronTexaco has had good news (...): the
company has found more oil and natural gas than it has produced. Over that
time, ChevronTexaco's proven oil and gas reserves have risen 14 percent, more
than one billion barrels.
(...)
For each of those years, ChevronTexaco's wells have produced less oil and gas
than the year before. Even as reserves have risen, the company's annual output
has fallen by almost 15 percent, and the declines have continued recently
despite a company promise to increase production in 2002.

* An Oil Enigma: Production Falls Even as Reserves Rise, Alex Berenson , NY
Times


_________________________________________________________________

17. This Spy for Rent , NY Times

Excerpts: Assessing, cultivating and recruiting spies has long been a key job
of Central Intelligence Agency officers. But now it is the C.I.A. officers
themselves who are being assessed, cultivated and recruited ?sometimes right
out of the agency's cafeteria. In what is leading to a critical spy drain,
private companies are aggressively seeking highly trained employees of our
espionage agencies to fill government contracts.


(...) the privatization of our spies has been largely overlooked.


(...) So for now it is building up its staff by turning to the
"intelligence-industrial complex."

* This Spy for Rent , James Bamford , NY Times


_________________________________________________________________

18. Memos on Torture Conflict with Bush Legal Policies , NPR

Excerpts: Bush administration memos from the departments of Justice and Defense
reportedly contradict other administration policies on torture and
interrogation -- especially the administration's arguments made at the Supreme
Court. The memos have been revealed by media outlets this week amid
congressional calls for making them public. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports.

* Memos on Torture Conflict with Bush Legal Policies, 04/06/09, NPR


_________________________________________________________________

18.01. Iraq Abuse 'Came From US Policy' , BBC News

Excerpts: HRW says the abuses came out of the Bush administration's decision to
ignore domestic and international laws after the 11 September terror attacks.

Human Rights Watch says this led to the United States creating offshore,
off-limits prisons like Guantanamo Bay and also sending prisoners to other
countries where information was beaten out of them.

The report says the US also decided to ignore its own laws and international
human rights law by inflicting pain and humiliation on detainees to soften them
up for interrogation.

* Iraq Abuse 'Came From US Policy', 04/06/10, BBC News


_________________________________________________________________

18.02. Use of Dogs to Scare Prisoners Was Approved , Washington Post

Excerpts: Dog handlers say the intimidation tactic was approved by the
highest-ranking military intelligence officer at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

* Use of Dogs to Scare Prisoners Was Approved, Josh White  , Scott Higham  ,
04/06/10, The Washington Post


_________________________________________________________________

18.03. A Look Behind the 'Wire' At Guantanamo , Washington Post

Excerpts: Extraordinarily long interrogation sessions were having a "cumulative
effect" on the mental health of the captives. And the reliance upon open-air
cages instead of enclosed cells constituted inhumane treatment under the
international laws of war.

Nearly two years after the camp opened, Red Cross officials sharply criticized
the U.S. government for continuing to use the cages (...) and for failing to
establish due process or a stepped-up release schedule, according to the
memos.
"There was no improvement in any of the four major areas of concern," (...).

* A Look Behind the 'Wire' At Guantanamo, Scott Higham  , 04/06/13, Washington
Post


_________________________________________________________________

18.04. Iraq Tactics Have Long History With U.S. Interrogators , Washington Post

Excerpts: A CIA handbook on coercive interrogation methods, (...) based on
research and field experience.(...)
And among the manual's conclusions: The threat of pain is a far more effective
interrogation tool than actually inflicting pain, but threats of death do not
help.(...)
"Results produced only after weeks or months of imprisonment in an ordinary
cell can be duplicated in hours or days in a cell which has no light or weak
artificial light which never varies, which is sound-proofed, and in which odors
are eliminated," the manual said.

* Iraq Tactics Have Long History With U.S. Interrogators , Walter Pincus ,
04/06/13, Washington Post


_________________________________________________________________

18.05. Guantanamo List Details Approved Interrogation Methods , Washington Post

Excerpts: A still-classified list of 24 interrogation methods approved for use
on Guantanamo Bay detainees includes placing prisoners in uncomfortable
interrogation cells and deceiving them into thinking they are in the hands of
Middle East interrogators who knew all about their culture, a U.S. government
official said. (...)

The existence of the Guantanamo list was previously known, and a few of its
methods have been cited in The Washington Post, including allowing
interrogators to subject detainees to irritatingly hot or cold temperatures and
to reverse their normal sleep patterns.

* Guantanamo List Details Approved Interrogation Methods, Dana Priest , Bradley
Graham
, 04/06/10, Washington Post Staff Writers


_________________________________________________________________

19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Networks





_________________________________________________________________

19.01. The War on Terrorism: The Big Picture , Parameters

Excerpts: (...) Secretary Rumsfeld's internal memo disclosed his frank
assessment that we appear little closer to resolving the actual challenge that
drives us, eradicating the group that carried out the 9/11 attacks and
preventing any repeats. While the United States and its allies have seized a
portion of al Qaeda lieutenants and assets, the organization remains vibrant,
its senior leadership largely intact, its popularity greater than ever, its
ability to recruit unbroken, and its ideology and funds spreading across a
global network (...) .

* The War on Terrorism: The Big Picture, Peter Singer,  , Parameters (Summer
2004)


_________________________________________________________________

19.02. U.S. Wrongly Reported Drop in World Terrorism in 2003 , NY Times

Excerpts: The State Department acknowledged Thursday that it was wrong in
reporting that terrorism declined worldwide last year, a finding the Bush
administration had pointed to as evidence of its success in countering terror.

Instead, the number of incidents and the toll in victims increased sharply, the
department said. Statements by senior administration officials claiming success
were based "on the facts as we had them at the time; the facts that we had were
wrong," Richard A. Boucher, the State Department spokesman, said.
Editor's Note: It seems to be a signature of a democratic systems that
government declared reality can be corrected by factual evidence.

* U.S. Wrongly Reported Drop in World Terrorism in 2003, 04/06/11, The
Associated Press, NY Times



_________________________________________________________________

19.03. Isolation Is Not The Answer , Nature

Excerpts: International scientific collaboration is the best defence against
bioterror.

The fear of bioterrorism is increasing scientific isolationism in the United
States. New restrictions on the publication of sensitive information relevant
to biological weapons, on access to 'select' biological agents for research,
and on the training of scientists from specified countries are some examples.
Although restrictions on scientific activities might make sense in the context
of nuclear-weapons proliferation, they may end up being counter-productive for
the United States' defence against bioterror.

* Isolation Is Not The Answer , Thomas May , 04/06/10, Nature429, 603
Commentary


_________________________________________________________________

20. Links & Snippets





_________________________________________________________________

20.01. Other Publications



- Temporal Order Of Nonlinear Dynamics In Human Brain, W. S. Tirsch
tirsch@gsf.de , H. Scher  , M. Keidel , May 2004, online 2004/03/05, Brain
Research Reviews, DOI: 10.1016/j.brainresrev.2004.01.002
- Speculation About Behavior, Brain Damage, And Self-Organization: The Other
Way To Herd A Cat, A. Colangelo buchanan@uwindsor.ca , J. G. Holden  , L.
Buchanan  , G. C. Van Ordenc , 14:4, 2004, Brain and Language, DOI:
10.1016/S0093-934X(03)00428-0
- Intelligence And Working Memory Systems: Evidence Of Neural Efficiency In
Alpha Band ERD, R. H. Grabner  , A. Fink  , A. Stipacek  , C. Neuper  , A. C.
Neubauer aljoscha.neubauer@uni-graz.at , Jul. 2004, online 2004/04/27,
Cognitive Brain Research, DOI: 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.02.010
- The Where And How Of Attention-Based Rehearsal In Spatial Working Memory, B.
R. Postle postle@wisc.edu , E. Awh  , J. Jonides  , E. E. Smith  , M.
D'Esposito , Jul. 2004, online 2004/04/23, Cognitive Brain Research, DOI:
10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.02.008
- Neural Correlates Of Working Memory For Sign Language, J. R nberg
jr@ibv.liu.se , M. Rudner  , M. Ingvar , Jul. 2004, online 2004/04/14,
Cognitive Brain Research, DOI: 10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2004.02.002
- Males Don't Listen - Even When They're Seabirds, V. Bridge
v.bridge@leeds.ac.uk , 2004/06/08, Alphagalileo
- Social Networks In The Guppy (Poecilia Reticulata), D. P. Croft  , J. Krause
, R. James , 2004/06/08, Alphagalileo & Biology Letters
- Cranial Mechanics And Feeding In Tyrannosaurus Rex, E. J. Rayfield ,
2004/06/08, Alphagalileo & Proceedings Biological Sciences
- Can Too Strong Female Choice Deteriorate Male Ornamentation?, L. J. Morrell
, H. Kokko , 2004/06/08, Alphagalileo & Proceedings Biological Sciences
- Individual Recognition, Dominance Hierarchies And Winner And Loser Effects,
L. A. Dugatkin  , R. L. Earley , 2004/06/08, Alphagalileo & Proceedings
Biological Sciences
- Purdue Mathematician Claims Proof For Riemann Hypothesis, 2004/06/09,
ScienceDaily & Purdue University
- How Brain Gives Special Resonance To Emotional Memories, 2004/06/10,
ScienceDaily & Duke University
- Civil Society Iraq: Ethnic, Religious, and Location Influences on Outgroup
Perception, JN Gresham , 2004-05-24, CogPrints
- How We Might be Able to Understand the Brain, Josephson, Brian D. ,
2004-06-05, CogPrints (Proc. ICCS2004)
- Implementation of Logical Functions in the Game of Life, J.-P. Rennard ,
2004-06-04, arXiv, DOI: cs.CC/0406009
- Zipf's Law and the Creation of Musical Context, Damian H. Zanette ,
2004-06-07, arXiv, DOI: cs.CL/0406015
- Blind Construction of Optimal Nonlinear Recursive Predictors for Discrete
Sequences, Cosma Rohilla Shalizi , Kristina Lisa Shalizi , 2004-06-06, arXiv,
DOI: cs.LG/0406011
- Can two Chaotic Systems Make an Order?, J. Almeida , D. Peralta-Salas , M.
Romera , 2004-06-07, arXiv, DOI: nlin.CD/0406010
- The Emergence of Prime Numbers as the Result of Evolutionary Strategy, Pauoo
R. A. Campos , Viviane M. de Oliveira , R. Giro , Douglas S. Galvao ,
2004-06-07, arXiv, DOI: q-bio.PE/0406017
- Self-organized Critical Pinball Machine, Henrik Flyvbjerg , 2004-06-02,
Physica A, Article in Press, Uncorrected Proof, DOI:
10.1016/j.physa.2004.05.005
- The Ensemble Approach to Understand Genetic Regulatory Networks, Stuart
Kauffman , 2004-05-31, Physica A, Article in Press, Uncorrected Proof, DOI:
10.1016/j.physa.2004.05.018
- Changes In Job Security And Their Causes: An Empirical Analysis For France,
1982-2002, P. Givord pauline.givord@insee.fr , E. Maurin maurin@ensae.fr , Jun.
2004, European Economic Review, DOI: 10.1016/S0014-2921(03)00043-6
- Residential Electricity Demand In Taiwan, P. Holtedahl  , F. L. Joutz
bmark@gwu.edu , Mar. 2004, Energy Economics, DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2003.11.001
- Memos on Torture Conflict with Bush Legal Policies , 04/06/09, NPR, Bush
administration memos from the departments of Justice and Defense reportedly
contradict other administration policies on torture and interrogation --
especially the administration's arguments made at the Supreme Court. The memos
have been revealed by media outlets this week amid congressional calls for
making them public. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports.
- Ice Cores Unlock Climate Secrets, Julianna Kettlewell , 04/06/09, BBC News
Online,
- Nanotech Guru Turns Back On 'Goo', Paul Rincon , 04/06/09, BBC News Online,
- Scientists 'See New Species Born', David Whitehouse , 04/06/09, BBC News
Online.
- Experiences With Iraqi Insurgents, Patrick Graham, Contributor to Harper's
Magazine discusses his experiences with Iraqi insurgents and his opinions of
their motivations.
, 04/06/08, c-span
- Web Site Lets Students Rate their Teachers , 04/06/11, NPR, ATC, Jennifer
Wing of member station KPLU in Seattle, Wash., reports on a Web site for school
children across the country -- RateMyTeachers.com -- that allows them to
"grade" their teachers.
- DNA Damage Piles Up in the Aging Brain, By age 40, some genes in the human
brain stop working at peak capacity
- When Speciation Calls, Bat vocalizations can create new species
- Blind Date, Brush Turkey Style, How does a bird who's never seen one of its
own kind find a mate?
- Rats Might Redraw Polynesian Immigration Route, Ancient colonists' favorite
rodent may upset a theory about their origins
- RNA Fights Brain Disease in Mice, First viral RNAi therapy for inherited
disease raises hopes of clinical
trial
- Emergence in Complex Cognitive, Social and Biological Systems , Gianfranco
Minati,Eliano Pessa
  , 02/07, ISBN 0-306-47358-5, Hardbound
Price: 144.00 EUR/125.00 USD/87.50 GBP. proceedings of the second Conference of
the Italian Systems Society www.airs.it .
- Unit Says It Gave Earlier Warning of Abuse in Iraq, Andrea Elliott
, Starting in November, a small unit of interrogators at Abu Ghraib prison
began reporting allegations of prisoner abuse.
- World Faces Seeping Flood Crisis , The number of people exposed to major
flooding will double to two billion within 50 years, a UN study warns.
- US U-Turn On Upbeat Terror Report, Global terror attacks are on the rise,
says the US State Department admitting an earlier report claiming a fall was
wrong.
- Nutrient Regulation Of Cell Cycle Progression , Brenda L. Bohnsack , Karen K.
Hirschi
, Annual Review of Nutrition; Volume 24, Page 433 - 453
- Spinal Cord Injury Treatment Raises Hope, Experts say the results look
promising, but caution that with just 16 people treated so far, it is too early
to draw any conclusions
- Locust Swarms May Spiral Into Plague, Shaoni Bhattacharya , 04/06/09, New
Scientist, A population boom in locusts in north Africa may lead to a plague,
warns the UN, as Spain sends planes to spray the pests
- Virtual Fences To Herd Wi-Fi Cattle, A farmer could control multiple herds
from a single server at home, as if he were playing a video game
- Higher-Ranking Officer Is Sought to Lead the Abu Ghraib Inquiry, Eric Schmitt
, The step would allow the inquiry into abuses at Abu Ghraib prison to reach
into the military's highest ranks in Iraq.
- Study Finds Senior Exams Are Too Basic, Diana Jean Schemo , A study of high
school graduation exams shows that they largely test material taught in the 9th
and 10th grades.
- Fight Fire With Compassion, Donald P. Gregg , I learned from my experiences
in Vietnam that by treating prisoners humanely we frequently gained valuable
intelligence from them.
- An American in The Hague?, Jonathan D. Tepperman , The United States will
find it difficult to prosecute foreign war criminals if it refuses to accept
for itself legal standards it accuses them of breaking.
- Molecular Mechanisms Of Mammalian Dna Repair And The DNA Damage Checkpoints ,
Aziz Sancar , Laura A. Lindsey-Boltz , Keziban Unsal-Kaccmaz , Stuart Linn
, Annual Review of Biochemistry; Volume 73, Page 39 - 85
- Incorporation Of Nonnatural Amino Acids Into Proteins , Tamara L. Hendrickson
, Valerie de Crecy-Lagard , Paul Schimmel
, Annual Review of Biochemistry; Volume 73, Page 147 - 176
- Crawling Toward A Unified Model Of Cell Mobility: Spatial And Temporal
Regulation of Actin Dynamics , Susanne M. Rafelski , Julie A. Theriot
, Annual Review of Biochemistry; Volume 73, Page 209 - 239
- Intermediate Filaments: Molecular Structure, Assembly Mechanism, And
Integration Into Functionally Distinct Intracellular Scaffolds , Harald
Herrmann , Ueli Aebi

, Annual Review of Biochemistry; Volume 73, Page 749 - 789
- Analyzing Cellular Biochemistry In Terms Of Molecular Networks , Yu Xia ,
Haiyuan Yu , Ronald Jansen , Michael Seringhaus , Sarah Baxter , Dov
Greenbaum , Hongyu Zhao , Mark Gerstein
, Annual Review of Biochemistry; Volume 73, Page 1051 - 1087
- Memo Says Torture 'May Be Justified' , The Aug. 1, 2002, memorandum from the
Justice Department was written at the request of the CIA, and was the focus of
a recent article in The Washington Post.
(By Dana Priest, The Washington Post)
- Contractor Immunity a Divisive Issue , Iraq's new government has been
resisting a U.S. demand that thousands of foreign contractors in Baghdad be
granted immunity from Iraqi law, Iraqi sources say.
(By Edward Cody, The Washington Post)
- Free Kicks Under The Microscope, New technology is designed to monitor the
flight of swerving footballs.
- Skylarks Helped By 'Crop Circles', Leaving fallow patches in cereal fields
could help boost skylark breeding, a survey shows.
- A Computer That Has an Eye for Van Gogh Douglas Heingartner, 04/06/13, Van
Gogh's "Olive Grove, 1889" was X-rayed for the project.



_________________________________________________________________

20.02. Webcast Announcements




Evolutionary Epistemology, Language, and Culture, Brussels, Belgium,
04/05/26-28


International Conference on Complex Systems 2004, Boston, 04/05/16-21


Life, a Nobel Story, Brussels, Belgium, 04/04/28


Nonlinear Dynamics and Statistical Mechanics Days, Brussels, Belgium,
04/04/26-27


Science Education Forum for Chinese Language Culture, , Panel Discussion,
Taipei, Taiwan, 04/05/01


Biologically Inspired Approaches to Advanced Information Technology, ,
Lausanne,Switzerland, 04/01/29-30


Nonlinear Dynamics And Chaos: Lab Demonstrations, Strogatz, Steven H.,
Internet-First University Press, 1994

World Economic Forum 2004, Davos, Switzerland   Riding the Next Democratic
Wave, Al-Thani, Khan, Vike-Freiberga, Wade, Soros, Zakaria, World Economic
Forum, 04/01/25
  The Future of Global Interdependence, Kharrazi, Held, Owens, Shourie, Annan,
Martin, Schwab, World Economic Forum, 04/01/25  Why Victory Against Terrorism
Demands Shared Values

  CODIS 2004, International Conference On Communications, Devices And
Intelligent Systems, 2004 Calcutta, India, 04/01/09-10 EVOLVABILITY &
INTERACTION: Evolutionary Substrates of Communication, Signaling, and
Perception in the Dynamics of Social Complexity, London, UK, 03/10/08-10 The
Semantic Web and Language Technology - Its Po tential and Practicalities,
Bucharest, Romania, 03/07/28-08/08 ECAL 2003, 7th European Conference on
Artificial Life, Dortmund, Germany, 03/09/14-17 New Santa Fe Institute
President About His Vision for SFI's Future Role, (Video, Santa Fe, NM,
03/06/04) SPIE's 1st Intl Symp on Fluctuations and Noise, Santa Fe, NM,
2003/06/01-04 NAS Sackler Colloquium on Mapping Knowledge Domains, Video/Audio
Report, 03/05/11 13th Ann Intl Conf, Soc f Chaos Theory in Psych & Life
Sciences, Boston, MA, USA, 2003/08/08-10 CERN Webcast Service, Streamed videos
of Archived Lectures and Live Events Dean LeBaron's Archive of Daily Video
Commentary, Ongoing Since February 1998 Edge Videos




_________________________________________________________________

20.03. Conference & Call for Papers Announcements




  ECC8
  Experimental Chaos Conference, Florence, Italy,
  04/06/14-17

  An Intl Tribute to Francisco Varela, Paris,04/06/18-20

  7th
Intl Conf on Linking Systems Thinking, Innovation,Quality, Entrepreneurship and
Environment (STIQE),
MARIBOR, SLOVENIA, 04/06/24-26


Biannual Meeting Society for Research on Biological Rhythms, Whistler, BC,
04/06/24-26


NAACSOS 2004, North American Association for Computational Social and
Organizational Science, Pittsburgh PA, 04/06/27-29


Statphys - Kolkata V An International Conference on Complex Networks:
Structure, Function and Processes , Kolkata, India, 04/06/27-30


ICAD 2004 10th International Conference on Auditory Display, Sydney, Australia,
04/07/06-09


3rd Intl School Topics in Nonlinear Dynamics Discrete Dynamical Systems and
Applications , Urbino (Italy), 04/07/07-09

  `Perspectives on Nonlinear Dynamics 2004 (PNLD-2004), Chen!
nai, India, 04/07/12-15

  From Animals To Animats
  8, 8th Intl Conf On The Simulation Of Adaptive Behavior
  (SAB'04), Los Angeles, USA, 04/07/13-17

  14th Annual International Conference The Society for Chaos Theory in
Psychology & Life Sciences , Milwaukee, WI, USA, 04/07/15-18


Facing Complexity, Wellington, NZ, 04/07/15-17


  Interdisciplinary Colloquium, Security Bytes, Security/Life/Terror
, Lancaster, 04/07/17-19

  Gordon Research Conference on "Oscillations & Dynamic Instabilities In
Chemical Systems", Lewiston, ME, 04/07/18-23

  3rd
Intl Conf Autonomous Agents & Multi-Agent Systems Conference (AAMAS 2004), New
York City, 04/07/19-23

7th
Intl Workshop on: Trust in Agent Societies , New York City, 04/07/19-20

  8th
  World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and
  Informatics, Orlando, Florida, USA, 04/07/18-21


The 4 th International Workshop on Meta-Synthesis and Complex Systems
(MCS'2004) , Beijing, 04/07/22-23

  2004
  Summer Simulation MultiConference (SummerSim'04), San Jose
  Hyatt, San Jose, California, 04/07/25-29

  SME 2004 Symposium on Modeling
  and Control of Economic Systems , University in Redlands, CA, 04/07/28-31

  6th
  International Mathematica Symposium (IMS 2004), Banff,
  Canada, 04/08/02-06

4th
  intl seminar on Collective Intelligence
, U of Ottawa, Canada, 04/08/08-10

  img src="http://alife.org/img/new.gif">
Real-Life Complex Adaptive Systems: Modelling And Control, session in Intl Conf
on Computing, Communications and Control Technologies: CCCT'04, Austin, Texas,
04/08/14-17

   Fractals and Natural Hazards at
32nd Intl Geological Congress (IGC), Florence, Italy, 04/08/20-28


Intl Conf on Science of Complex Networks: from Biology
to the Internet and WWW (CNET2004), Aveiro
(Portugal), 04/08/29-09/02




ICCC 2004, IEEE International Conference on Computational Cybernetics, ,
Vienna, Austria, 04/08/30-09/01

  ANTS
  2004, 4th International Workshop on Ant Colony
  Optimization and Swarm Intelligence, Brussels, Belgium,
  04/09/05-08

  Dynamic
  Ontology,
An Inquiry into Systems, Emergence, Levels of Reality,
  and Forms of Causality, Trento, Italy,
  04/09/08-11

  9th
  Intl Conf on the Simulation and Synthesis of Living Systems
  (ALIFE9), Boston, Massachusetts, 04/09/12-15

  Neuroeconomics 2004, Charleston, SC, 04/09/16-19

  TNew Economic Windows 2004: Complexity Hints for Economic Policy, Salerno,
Italy, 04/09/16-18

  The
Verhulst 200 on Chaos, Brussels, BELGIUM, 04/09/16-18

  The
  8th Intl Conf on Parallel Problem Solving from Nature
  (PPSN VIII), Birmingham, UK, 04/09/18-22

  The
  Nonlinear Waves in Fluids: Recent Advances and Modern Applications, Udine,
Italy, 04/09/18-22

  XVII Brazilian
  Symposium on Artificial Intelligence, Sao Luis, Maranhao -
  Brazil, 04/09/22-24

  3rd Natll Conf on Systems Science ,
Trento (Italy), 04/10/07-09

   TEDMED Conference ,
Charleston SC, 04/10/12-15

  Intl Workshop On Bifurcations In Nonsmooth And Hybrid Dynamical Systems  ,
Milano (Italy), 04/10/21-22

  Wolfram
  Technology Conference, Champaign, Illinois,
  04/10/21-23

  6th Intl Conf on Electronic Commerce
ICEC'2004: Towards A New Services Landscape,  Delft, The Netherlands,
04/10/25-27

   Complexity and Philosophy Workshop - 2-Day Conference ,  Rio de Janeiro,
04/11


ICDM '04: The Fourth IEEE Intl Conf on Data Mining, Brighton, UK, 04/11/01-04

  The 7th Asia-Pacific Complex Systems Conference,  Queensland, Australia,
04/12/06-10

  17th Australian Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence,  Queensland,
Australia, 04/12/06-10


18th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations (ICNF 2005), Salamanca,
Spain, 05/09/19-23


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