ժ NO2003.29

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Complexity Digest 2003.29 Archive: http://www.comdig.org, European Mirror:
http://www.comdig.de
Asian Mirror: http://www.phil.pku.edu.cn/resguide/comdig/ (Chinese GB-Code)
"I think the next
century will be the century of complexity." Stephen Hawking

_________________________________________________________________

Content:

01. Excellence in Computer Simulation , arXiv
02. Transcription Regulation And Animal Diversity , Nature
03. Researchers Locate Tumor-suppressor Gene in Fruit Flies That Controls
Cell Production, Death ,
EurekAlert
04. Predicting Future Rewards , Science
04.01. Conversion of Working Memory to Motor Sequence , Science
05. Modified Mice Show Super-Healing Powers , New Scientist
06. Head Size Gives Autism Early Warning , New Scientist
06.01. A Sigh of Relief for Painkillers , Science
07. HIV Hybrid Formed In A Human Revealed , New Scientist
08. Identification Of A Complex Neurophysiological System , J. Biol. Sys.
09. Stochastics Of Order: Applications To Population Dynamics, And
Complexity , J. Biol. Sys.
10. Biodiversity Meets the Atmosphere: A Global View of Forest Canopies ,
Science
10.01. Modelling Food Webs , Handbook of Graphs and Networks
10.02. The Evolution Of Movements And Behaviour: Experiment With
Butterflies , Alphagalileo & Proc.
B
11. Pattern Formations In Chemical Systems , Adv. in Complex Sys.
12. The Impressive Complexity In The Nautilus Pompilius Shell , Fractals
12.01. Evolution Of Complex Flowering Strategies: Integral Projection Model
Approach , Alphagalileo
& Proc. B
13. Bacterial Communication: Tiny Teamwork , Nature
14. Hydrogen Lifts Off - With A Heavy Load , Nature
15. Playing Tricks with Slow Light , Science
16. Teaching Computers to Work in Unison , NYTimes
17. Picking Up the Pieces , NYTimes
18. US Unprepared for Iraq Order Collapse - Wolfowitz , Reuters
18.01. Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz Interview , Los Angeles Times
19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Networks
19.01. Lack of Pre-9/11 Sources to Be Cited as Intelligence Failure , NYTimes
19.02. Pattern of Corruption , NYTimes
20. Links & Snippets
20.01. Other Papers
20.02. Coming and Ongoing Webcasts
20.03. Conference Announcements & Call for Papers
20.04. ComDig Announcement: New ComDig Archive in Beta Test

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01. Excellence in Computer Simulation , arXiv

Abstract: Excellent computer simulations are done for a purpose. The most
valid purposes are to
explore uncharted territory, to resolve a well-posed scientific or
technical question, or to make a
design choice. Stand-alone modeling can serve the first purpose. The other
two goals need a full
integration of the modeling effort into a scientific or engineering program.
  Some excellent work, much of it related to the Department of Energy
Laboratories, is reviewed.
Some less happy stories are recounted.
  In the past, some of the most impressive work has involved complexity and
chaos. Prediction in a
complex world requires a first principles understanding based upon the
intersection of theory,
experiment and simulation.

* Excellence in Computer Simulation, Leo P. Kadanoff, 2003-07-13, DOI:
cs.CC/0307033, arXiv
* Contributed by Carlos Gershenson


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02. Transcription Regulation And Animal Diversity , Nature

Excerpts: Whole-genome sequence assemblies are now available for seven
different animals, including
nematode worms, mice and humans. Comparative genome analyses reveal a
surprising constancy in
genetic content: vertebrate genomes have only about twice the number of
genes that invertebrate
genomes have, and the increase is primarily due to the duplication of
existing genes rather than
the invention of new ones. How, then, has evolutionary diversity arisen?
Emerging evidence suggests
that organismal complexity arises from progressively more elaborate
regulation of gene expression.

* Transcription Regulation And Animal Diversity, Michael Levine, Robert
Tjian, 10 July 2003, DOI:
10.1038/nature01763, Nature 424, 147 - 151


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03. Researchers Locate Tumor-suppressor Gene in Fruit Flies That Controls
Cell Production, Death ,
EurekAlert

Excerpts: UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas researchers have
discovered a tumor-suppressor
gene that, in fruit flies, simultaneously restricts cell proliferation and
promotes cell death, a
process that may also play an important role in the genesis of cancer in
humans. Removal of the
gene, hippo, resulted in tumor formation in every organ of the fruit fly.
The findings, which are
currently online, will appear in an upcoming issue of Cell. "This is one of
the few genes that has
been discovered that directly controls two pathways, cell proliferation and
cell apoptosis, or cell
death," said Dr. Duojia Pan, assistant professor of physiology and senior
author of the study.
"Sustained growth of cancer cells requires activation of the cell
proliferation machinery and
suppression of a system called the apoptotic failsafe mechanism. The
combination of suppressed cell
death and deregulated cell production is likely a key element in cancer."

* Researchers Locate Tumor-suppressor Gene in Fruit Flies That Controls
Cell Production, Death,
2003-07-16, EurekAlert
* Contributed by Nadia Gershenson


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04. Predicting Future Rewards , Science

Excerpts: Our sense of which behavior to choose to reach a goal or obtain a
reward is based on the
perceived value of the reward, the effort needed to obtain it, and our
previous experience about
the likelihood of success. Information for anticipating reward is often
provided through
associations of these factors with environmental cues. Research over the
past decade has yielded a
great deal of information about how and where assessments related to
anticipated reward occur in
the brain.

* Predicting Future Rewards, Barry J. Richmond, Zheng Liu, and Munetaka
Shidara, Science 2003 301:
179-180


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04.01. Conversion of Working Memory to Motor Sequence , Science

Abstract: To plan a serial order behavior, we hold serial sensory
information in our minds and
convert it to a movement program. We trained monkeys to memorize a sequence
of positional cues and
to reproduce it by making saccades in either the original or reverse order.
The order was
determined in the middle of a trial on the basis of an instruction
stimulus. Triggered by the
instruction stimulus, single neurons in the dorsal premotor cortex became
transiently active only
when the order needed to be determined. These transient neurons, together
with nearby sustained
neurons that hold information on cue or movement sequences, appear to
mediate the generation of a
motor program from the maintained information.

* Conversion of Working Memory to Motor Sequence in the Monkey Premotor
Cortex, Ohbayashi, Machiko,
Ohki, Kenichi, Miyashita, Yasushi, Science 2003 301: 233-236


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05. Modified Mice Show Super-Healing Powers , New Scientist

Excerpts: Mice with a remarkable ability to heal wounds have been
genetically engineered by
scientists. The research may lead to better future treatments for skin
disorders. The researchers
were analysing the role of a gene linked to blood vessel formation when
they inadvertently created
mice with significantly thickened skin, swollen ears, noses and eyelids.
Tests showed these mice
also had the ability to rapidly heal wounds - two millimetre-wide holes
created in the mice's ears
closed completely within 28 days.

* Modified Mice Show Super-Healing Powers, Gaia Vince, 03/07/15, New Scientist


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06. Head Size Gives Autism Early Warning , New Scientist

Excerpts: The brains of autistic children undergo an abnormal and dramatic
growth spurt in the
first year of their lives, according to a new study. The growth makes their
heads markedly larger
than those of normal infants.(..) During normal development, the brain
grows slowly, and synapses,
the connections among nerve cells, are retained or eliminated in response
to sensory stimulation or
motor activity. Courchesne proposes that the unchecked brain growth seen in
the study may undermine
this synaptic strengthening and pruning process, leading to the social
isolation characteristic of
the disorder.

* Head Size Gives Autism Early Warning, Peter Farley, 03/07/16, New Scientist


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06.01. A Sigh of Relief for Painkillers , Science

Excerpts: Like morphine and other narcotics, a painkiller called fentanyl
disrupts nerve cells deep
in the brain that register pain as well as another subset that governs
breathing rhythm.
Well-controlled doses of the drug can work wonders, but overexposure can be
disastrous: In October
2002, 129 people died in a Moscow theater when authorities subdued
hostage-takers there by pumping
what many believe was fentanyl into the building.(...) Could fentanyl's
effects on breathing and
pain be separated? Their conclusion, reported on page 226, is a resounding
"yes."

* A Sigh of Relief for Painkillers, Jennifer Couzin, Science 2003 301: 150


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07. HIV Hybrid Formed In A Human Revealed , New Scientist

Excerpts: More than one type of the deadly virus can infect a person at the
same time - a state
called "superinfection". Scientists have long suspected that different
strains could combine to
produce a hybrid - but this had never been demonstrated before in a person with
sexually-transmitted HIV. Now scientists have shown that two major subtypes
of HIV-1 swapped genes
with each other to form an entirely new virus in a female patient.
Furthermore, the hybrid took
over from the original infections to become the dominant virus in the
woman's body.

* HIV Hybrid Formed In A Human Revealed, Shaoni Bhattacharya, 03/07/16, New
Scientist


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08. Identification Of A Complex Neurophysiological System , J. Biol. Sys.

Abstract: In this work we use Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) in order to
identify a complex
neurophysiological system, called muscle spindle that involves stationary
point processes. Two
cases are examined. In the first case, there is no input present and it is
shown that the system
fires spontaneously. In the second case, the system is affected by the
presence of a gamma
motoneurone. It is shown that there is no spontaneous activity and the
behavior of the system is
excitatory. In the present work a new parameter, the carry over effect
function is included in the
model (...) improves the results significantly.

* Identification Of A Complex Neurophysiological System Using The Maximum
Likelihood Approach, V.
K. Kotti & A. G. Rigas, Jun. 2003, DOI: 10.1142/S0218339003000798
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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09. Stochastics Of Order: Applications To Population Dynamics, And
Complexity , J. Biol. Sys.

Abstract: Biological dynamics which evolve continuously in time but are not
time differentiable,
necessarily exhibit random properties. These random features appear also as
a result of the
randomness of the proper time of biological systems. Usually, this is taken
into account by using
white noises that is to say fractals of order two. Fractals of order n
larger than two are more
suitable for increments with large amplitudes, and they may be introduced
by using either
real-valued fractal noises with long range memory (...). In the later case,
we are then led to
describe biological systems in the complex plane.

* Stochastics Of Order N In Biological Systems: Applications To Population
Dynamics,
Thermodynamics, Nonequilibrium Phase And Complexity, G. Jumarie, Jun. 2003
10.1142/S021833900300083X
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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10. Biodiversity Meets the Atmosphere: A Global View of Forest Canopies ,
Science

Abstract: The forest canopy is the functional interface between 90% of
Earth's terrestrial biomass
and the atmosphere. Multidisciplinary research in the canopy has expanded
concepts of global
species richness, physiological processes, and the provision of ecosystem
services. Trees respond
in a species-specific manner to elevated carbon dioxide levels, while
climate change threatens
plant-animal interactions in the canopy and will likely alter the
production of biogenic aerosols
that affect cloud formation and atmospheric chemistry.

* Biodiversity Meets the Atmosphere: A Global View of Forest Canopies,
Ozanne, C. M. P., Anhuf, D.,
Boulter, S. L., Keller, M., Kitching, R. L., Korner, C., Meinzer, F. C.,
Mitchell, A. W.,
Nakashizuka, T., Dias, P. L. Silva, Stork, N. E., Wright, S. J., Yoshimura,
M., Science 2003 301:
183-186


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10.01. Modelling Food Webs , Handbook of Graphs and Networks

Abstract: We review theoretical approaches to the understanding of food
webs. After an overview of
the available food web data, we discuss three different classes of models.
The first class comprise
static models, which assign links between species according to some simple
rule. The second class
are dynamical models, which include the population dynamics of several
interacting species. We
focus on the question of the stability of such webs. The third class are
species assembly models
and evolutionary models, which build webs starting from a few species by
adding new species through
a process of "invasion?(assembly models) or "speciation?(evolutionary
models). Evolutionary
models are found to be capable of building large stable webs.

* Modelling Food Webs, B. Drossel,  A. J. McKane, 2003, Handbook of Graphs
and Networks: From the
Genome to the Internet
* Contributed by Carlos Gershenson


_________________________________________________________________

10.02. The Evolution Of Movements And Behaviour: Experiment With
Butterflies , Alphagalileo & Proc.
B

Abstract: As habitats become more fragmented, mobility patterns of
organisms may also change.
Whether these are evolutionary changes, was studied by comparing the
behaviour of speckled wood
butterflies among woodland landscape and fragmented agricultural landscape.
Adult offspring of
field-collected females were introduced in outdoor cages providing an
artificial environment to
test for differences. Woodland butterflies covered longer flight distances,
were more prone to
cross open-shade boundaries and travelled more frequently between woodland
parts in the cages than
did agricultural butterflies. These results agree with heritable
differences in movements and
dispersal propensity among the landscapes pointing at evolutionary
consequences of habitat
fragmentation.

* The Evolution Of Movements And Behaviour At Boundaries In Different
Landscapes: A Common Arena
Experiment With Butterflies, T. Merckx, H. Van Dyck, B. Karlsson & O.
Leimar, 2003/07/11,
Alphagalileo & Proc. Biol. Sc.
* Contributed by Atin Das


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11. Pattern Formations In Chemical Systems , Adv. in Complex Sys.

Abstract: The formation of complex patterns in chemical systems is
discussed in the following
cases: relations of pattern formation to thermodynamics theories; unusually
complex pattern
formation in very simple experimental chemical systems; and numerical
simulation of patterns that
develop in multicellular chemical systems. The paper concludes with a
discussion on future
technological applications

* Pattern Formations In Chemical Systems, J. Maselko, May 2003, DOI:
10.1142/S0219525903000712
* Contributed by Pritha Das


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12. The Impressive Complexity In The Nautilus Pompilius Shell , Fractals

Abstract: The complexity of the Nautilus pompilius shell is analyzed in
terms of its fractal
dimension and its equiangular spiral form. Our findings assert that the
shell is fractal from its
birth and that its growth is dictated by a self-similar criterion (we
obtain the fractal dimension
of the shell as a function of time). The variables that have been used for
the analysis show an
exponential dependence on the number of chambers/age of the cephalopod, a
property inherited from
its form.

* The Impressive Complexity In The Nautilus Pompilius Shell, A. A. C. Pita,
J. R. C. Pita, A. S.
Galn & R. C. Garca, Jun. 2003, DOI: 10.1142/S0218348X03001653
* Contributed by Atin Das


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12.01. Evolution Of Complex Flowering Strategies: Integral Projection Model
Approach , Alphagalileo
& Proc. B

Abstract: We develop a mathematical modelling technique appropriate for
populations where
demographic rates, (i.e. growth, survival and reproduction) depend on an
individual's size and age.
General properties of these models are explored mathematically. The
technique is applied to a
long-term data set on the thistle Carlina vulgaris. We use the model to
predict how flowering
should depend on size and age. The model has excellent descriptive
properties but fails to predict
the distribution of sizes at reproduction. Possible reasons for this
discrepancy are discussed.

* Evolution Of Complex Flowering Strategies: An Age And Size-Structured
Integral Projection Model
Approach, D. Childs, M. Rees, K. E. Rose, P. J. Grubb & S. P. Ellner,
2003/07/11, Alphagalileo &
Proc. Biol. Sc.
* Contributed by Atin Das


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13. Bacterial Communication: Tiny Teamwork , Nature

Excerpts: Until recently, bacteria were considered to be self-contained and
self-sufficient
individuals. (...) We also assumed that they lacked the ability to
communicate, a crucial function
for organizing group activities. Our view has changed. Bacteria can
organize into groups, they can
communicate, and these abilities are important factors in the development
of many diseases.
Organized groups of bacteria in the form of biofilms often cause persistent
infections, such as
those of the middle ear, urinary tract, bone, heart valves and implanted
medical devices.

* Bacterial Communication: Tiny Teamwork, E. Peter Greenberg, 10 July 2003,
DOI: 10.1038/424134a,
Nature 424, 134


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14. Hydrogen Lifts Off - With A Heavy Load , Nature

Excerpts: If there is a way to make both electricity and hydrogen without
releasing carbon dioxide,
it would probably be wise to use it. In fact, it does exist and is already
in use. (...) It is
called nuclear fission power. Its fuel costs are fixed and supply is
assured for at least 500-1,000
years, by which time there may be neutron-free, 'clean' fusion ¡X maybe.
(...) Thus, the 400
gigawatts of electricity needed to extract hydrogen from water to power US
surface transport could
be cumulatively generated on land occupying only 233 km2.

* Hydrogen Lifts Off - With A Heavy Load, Paul Grant, 10 July 2003, DOI:
10.1038/424129a, Nature
424, 129 - 130


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15. Playing Tricks with Slow Light , Science

Excerpts: The speed of light pulses has been slowed to the snail's pace of
a few meters per second
(1). (...) This application of "slow light" holds promise for applications
in quantum communication
and computation. (...) The experiments reported by the two groups (3, 12)
demonstrate that
production of quantum mechanically correlated photons can be combined with
atomic memory. Such a
technique may become an important new tool for preparing, storing, and
manipulating quantum states
of light, and has some points in common with the delayed-choice quantum eraser

* Playing Tricks with Slow Light, Marlan O. Scully , M. Suhail Zubairy,
Science 2003 301: 181-182.


_________________________________________________________________

16. Teaching Computers to Work in Unison , NYTimes

Excerpts: The long-term grid vision is that anyone with a desktop machine
or hand-held computer can
have the power of a supercomputer at his or her fingertips. And small
groups with shared interests
could find answers to computationally complex problems as never before.
Imagine, for example, a
handful of concerned citizens running their own simulation of the
environmental impact of a
proposed real-estate development in their community. They wouldn't need
their own data center or
consultants.

* Teaching Computers to Work in Unison, Steve Lohr, 03/07/15, NYTimes


_________________________________________________________________

17. Picking Up the Pieces , NYTimes

Excerpts: Advanced scanning technology makes it possible to reconstruct
documents previously
thought safe from prying eyes, sometimes even pages that have been ripped
into confetti-size
pieces. And although a great deal of sensitive information is stored
digitally these days, recent
corporate scandals have shown that the paper shredder is still very much in
use. (...)
ChurchStreet's software analyzes the graphical patterns that go to the edge
of each piece. (...)
The pages are scanned, and software analyzes the shreds for possible matches.

* Picking Up the Pieces, Douglas Heingartner, 03/07/17, NYTimes


_________________________________________________________________

18. US Unprepared for Iraq Order Collapse - Wolfowitz , Reuters

Excerpts: Wolfowitz, a leading architect of the war in Iraq, told the paper
that no amount of
advance planning could have foreseen the collapse in law and order after
the U.S. and British
military victory. "The so-called forces of law and order (in Baghdad) just
kind of collapsed. There
is not a single plan that would have dealt with that," (...). "This is a
country that was ruled by
a gang of terrorist criminals and they're still around. They're threatening
Iraqis and killing
Americans," he said.

* US Unprepared for Iraq Order Collapse - Wolfowitz, 03/07/18, Reuters


_________________________________________________________________

18.01. Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz Interview , Los Angeles Times

Excerpts: The fact is we put a lot of thought and even contracts into
planning to repair oilfields
that we expected to be devastated. We put a lot of thought, and again
contracts into how to put out
oil fires in the north which would have been poisoning the whole
environment with hydrogen sulfide.
A lot of thought into, and again preparations, physical preparations, into
planning to feed
hundreds of thousands of displaced persons that would have been the result
of what was feared to be
largescale urban fighting.

* Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz Interview, Doyle McManus,
Esther Schraeder, 03/07/07,
updated 03/07/18, Interview with Los Angeles Times


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19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Networks





_________________________________________________________________

19.01. Lack of Pre-9/11 Sources to Be Cited as Intelligence Failure , NYTimes

Excerpts: One official who has read the report said counterterrorism
officials regularly complained
about the absence of human intelligence from the Afghanistan camps, saying
that counterterrorism
analysts were forced to rely on reports from foreign intelligence services,
satellite imagery and
intercepted communications, none of which detected any advance sign of the
impending attacks. "We
had amazing satellite pictures of them having graduation ceremonies at the
camps, but we never had
a clue what they planned to do when they left Afghanistan," one official said.

* Lack of Pre-9/11 Sources to Be Cited as Intelligence Failure, David
Johnston, 03/07/17, NYTimes


_________________________________________________________________

19.02. Pattern of Corruption , NYTimes

Excerpt: As Greg Thielmann, a former State Department intelligence
official, said last week, U.S.
intelligence analysts have consistently agreed that Saddam did not have a
"meaningful connection"
to Al Qaeda. Yet administration officials continually asserted such a
connection, even as they
suppressed evidence showing real links between Al Qaeda and Saudi
Arabia.(...) What about the risk
that an invasion of Iraq would weaken America's security? Warnings from
military experts that an
extended postwar occupation might severely strain U.S. forces have proved
precisely on the mark.

* Pattern of Corruption, Paul Krugman, 03/07/15, NYTimes


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20. Links & Snippets





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20.01. Other Papers





_________________________________________________________________

20.02. Coming and Ongoing Webcasts

  New Santa Fe Institute President About His Vision for SFI's Future Role,
(Video, Santa Fe, NM,
03/06/04) Edge Videos  Einstein And Poincaré, Peter Galison, 03/06/
Genome Changes
Everything, Matt Ridley, 03/06/ A United Biology, E.O. Wilson, 03/05/28 In
The Matrix, Martin Rees,
03/05/19 Who Cares About Fireflies? Steven Strogatz, 03/05/12   World
Economic Forum Extraordinary
Annual Meeting, Jordan, 03/06/21-23 SPIE's 1st Intl Symp on Fluctuations
and Noise, Santa Fe, NM,
2003/06/01-04 NAS Sackler Colloquium on Mapping Knowledge Domains,
Video/Audio Report, 03/05/11
Uncertainty and Surprise: Questions on Working with the Unexpected and
Unknowable, The University
of Texas Austin, Texas USA, 2003/04/10-12 New Trends In Industrial
Partnership And Innovation
Management At European Research Laboratories, CERN, Geneva, 2003/03/19
(with webcast)  CERN Webcast
Service, Streamed videos of Archived Lectures and Live Events   Dean
LeBaron's Archive of Daily
Video Commentary, Ongoing Since February 1998   




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20.03. Conference Announcements & Call for Papers

  Exystence Thematic Institute - Algorithms And Challenges In Hard
Combinatorial Problems - Trieste,
Italy, 03/07/01-31, Turin, Italy, 03/10/01-30 7th World Multi-Conference on
Systemics, Cybernetics
and Informatics (SCI 2003),  Orlando, Florida, 2003/07/27-30 BIFURCATIONS
2003, Southampton, UK,
03/07/28-30 Intl Conf on Socio Political Informatics and Cybernetics: SPIC
'03, Orlando, Fl, USA,
2003/07/31-08/02 Leadership for Complex Changes - Seattle Conference,
Seattle, WA USA, 03/08/04-05
13th Annual International Conference, Soc f Chaos Theory in Psych &
Life Sciences,Boston, MA,
USA, 2003/08/08-10 Thematic Institute "Networks and Risks", Budapest,
Hungary, 03/08/25 - 09/27
Conference on Growing Networks and Graphs in Statistical Physics, Finance,
Biology and Social
Systems, Rome, 03/09/01-05 Call for Papers on Dynamical Hierarchies,
Special Issue of Artificial
Life, Deadline: 2003/09/05 7th European Conference on Artificial Life
(ECAL-2003), Dortmund,
Germany, 2003/09/14-17 A Dual International Conference on Ethics,
Complexity & Organisations
& Creativity, London, UK, 2003/09/17-18 1st German Conference on
Multiagent System Technologies
(MATES'03), Erfurt, Germany, 2003/09/22-25 Dynamics Days 2003, XXIII Annual
Conference, 4 Decades
of Chaos 1963-2003, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, 03/09/24-27 Improving The NHS
Through The Lens Of
Complexity, U Exeter, UK, 03/09/24-26 Emerging Technologies Conference at
MIT, Cambridge, MA,
2003/09/24-25 Intl School Mathematical Aspects of Quantum Chaos II Quantum
Chaos on Hyperbolic
Manifolds, Schloss Reisensburg (Günzburg, Germany), 03/10/04-11 2003
IEEE/WIC Intl Joint Conf.
Web Intelligence and Intelligent Agent Technology, Halifax, Canada,
2003/10/13-17 American Society
for Cybernetics (ASC) 2003 Conference (H.v.Foerster), Vienna, Austria ,
2003/11/10-15 Trends And
Perspectives In Extensive And Non-Extensive Statistical Mechanics, In
Honour Of The 60th Birthday
Of Constantino Tsallis, Angra Dos Reis, Brazil, 2003/11/19-21 ICDM '03: The
Third IEEE
International Conference on Data Mining, Melbourne, Florida, USA,
2003/11/19-22 4th Intl Conf on
Systems Science and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong, 03/11/25-28 3rd
International Workshop on
Meta-Synthesis and Complex System, Guangzhou, China, 2003/11/29-30 2nd
International Workshop on
the Mathematics and Algorithms of Social Insects, Georgia Tech, Atlanta,
Georgia, USA;
2003/12/15-17 1st International Workshop on Biologically Inspired
Approaches to Advanced
Information Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland, 04/01/29-30 4th Intl ICSC
Symposium Engineering Of
Intelligent Systems (EIS 2004), Island of Madeira, Portugal, 04/02/29-03/02
Fractal 2004,
"Complexity and Fractals in Nature", 8th Intl Multidisciplinary Conf ,
Vancouver, Canada,
2004/04/04-07 Urban Vulnerability and Network Failure: Constructions and
Experiences of
Emergencies, Crises and Collapse, Manchester, UK, 04/04/29-30 Fifth
International Conference on
Complex Systems (ICCS2004), Boston, MA, USA, 2004/05/16-21 13th
International Symposium on HIV
& Emerging Infectious Diseases, Toulon, France, 04/06/03-05




_________________________________________________________________

20.04. ComDig Announcement: New ComDig Archive in Beta Test

We are in the process of upgrading the Complexity Digest archives to a
format with improved search
capabilities. Also, we will finally be able to adequately publish the
valuable feedback and
comments from our knowledgable readers. You are cordially invited to become
a beta tester of our
new ComDig2 archive.





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